Archives de l’auteur : mdrugeon

Séminaire Nancy Pedri (PMU, professeure à Memorial University of NewFoundLand au Canada) “Pointing to, and away from, Media, or How Intermediality Impacts the Reading of Comics” – mardi 18 avril 2024

animé par Laurence Petit (EMMA)

While comics scholars have examined the visual storytelling techniques and devices of comics – including page-layout, the use of repeated images, the gutter, the angle of vision, and others – the referencing or inclusion of different media has largely been ignored. I set out to explore how comics narration physically and conceptually moves between and across media boundaries, evoking different modes of representation to promote unique expressions and configurations of meaning.
Starting from the understanding that comics stand to be viewed productively not so much as a single, mixed, or even hybrid medium set in more than one semiotic mode, but as an “inherently intermedial form” (Kimmich 88), I will draw from several examples to examine the impact on reading of the interaction of different media and their conceptual and physical fusion in comics. I adopt an intermedial approach to examine intermediality in several comics. Focusing on how comics narration exists within a larger past and present media landscape, my presentation will be guided by the following questions: What type of reading do comics encourage? If, as I believe, comics’ intermedial storytelling practices asks readers to simultaneously draw from their knowledge of, and real-world experience with, other media, and delve deeper into the storyworld and the experiences of its characters, do those intermedial practices create a narrative situation that challenges popular theorizations of comics literacy?

References

Kimmich, Matt. “Disorienting Visualisations: Adapting Paul Auster’s City of Glass.” SPELL: Swiss Papers in English Language and Literature, vol.21, 2008. pp.87-104.

Short Bio

Nancy Pedri is Professor of English at Memorial University of Newfoundland and Labrador, where she has taught since 2006. She is an award-winning author and has published extensively in the fields of comics studies and word and image studies, including photography in literature. Her latest monographs on comics, Experiencing Visual Storyworlds: Focalization in Comics with Silke Horstkotte (Ohio State UP) and A Concise Dictionary of Comics (UP of Mississippi) were published in 2022.

Journée d’étude Is God Is de Aleshea Harris

Vendredi 26 avril 2024

Cycle de Séminaires ACT

Campus route de Mende salle G108 puis Campus St Charles salle des colloques 1

Programme :

8h15 Atelier de traduction (la scène d’ouverture) avec la traductrice Séverine Magois (Maison Antoine Vitez) et les metteurs en scène Béla Czuppon (La Baignoire) et Sébastien Derrey (Compagnie migratori k. merado)

10h Emeline Jouve (Université Toulouse-Jean Jaurès), “Présentation du projet ANR ACTiF (American Contemporary Theatre in France)”

11h Xavier Lemoine (Université Gustave Eiffel), “Enjeux du théâtre américain en France (Axe 3, projet ANR ACTiF)”

12h Déjeuner

13h Atelier de traduction (les monologues) avec la traductrice Séverine Magois et les metteurs en scène Béla Czuppon et Sébastien Derrey

15h30 Présentation du séminaire ACT dans le cadre de la journée EMMAncipons les Savoirs, salle des colloques 1, Campus St Charles


Informations pratiques : l’entrée et la participation aux ateliers sont libres

Contact : marianne.drugeon@univ-montp3.fr

“Narrative Transfers: From the Literary to the Graphic”Nancy Pedri (Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada)Laurence Petit (Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3, France)

Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3, France, jeudi 25 avril 2024

The one-day international research workshop will be held at the Université Paul Valéry-Montpellier 3 on April 25 of this year and will examine the impact on characters when literary texts are adapted into comic form. Although several scholars have engaged in the study of comics adaptation, the questions arising from the adaptation of a literary character through its embodiment in a comics storyworld have been grossly overlooked.

Through our introduction, five presentations and guided discussions, and a concluding discussion, we hope to explore:

  1. how embodiment in a comics narrative transforms literary characters and to what effect
  2. how a character’s embodiment in a comics narrative impacts the reader’s experience and understanding of the work
  3. if and how continuity is achieved when literary characters are made to inhabit new temporal and spatial dimensions in the comics different storyworld
  4. the impact on interpretation when literary characters have been adapted into comics more than once.

Programme

9:00 – 9:30                Nancy Pedri (Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada) and Laurence Petit (Université Paul Valéry-Montpellier 3, France) :Welcoming comments and introduction to the topic

9:30 – 10:15              Michel De Dobbeleer (Universiteit Gent / Ghent University, Belgium) :Title: Adapting Anna Karenina for Russo- and Anglophone Comics Readers: Evolving Characters and Audiences

    10:15 – 10:45            Coffee break

10:45 – 11:30            Brigitte Friant-Kessler (Université Polytechnique Hauts de France, Valenciennes, France) :Title: When the Novel Goes Graphic, or the Stuff ‘Comicking’ Is Made on: Martin Rowson’s Tristram and Gulliver (online)

11:30 – 12:00             Discussion

    12:00 – 14:00            Lunch break

14:00 – 14:45            Marina Rauchenbacher (Universität Wien, Austria) :Title: Arranged in Color. Janne Marie Dauer’s Comic Adaptation of Bov Bjerg’s Novel Auerhaus (online)

14:45 – 15:30            Eleanor Ty (Wilfrid Laurier University, Canada) : Title: Repressed Trauma in Nnedi Okorafor’s After the Rain

    15:30 – 16:00            Coffee break

16:00 – 17:00            Round table / Closing comments

Séminaire: Susan Blattès (Grenoble-Alpes), Marianne Drugeon (Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3), Claire Hélie (Lille), Marie Nadia Karsky (Paris 8), Estelle Rivier-Arnaud (Grenoble-Alpes), Agathe Torti-Alcayaga (Paris Sorbonne Nord), The Gut Girls de Sarah Daniels, une expérience de traduction collaborative – Mardi 26 mars 2024 18h – Site Saint-Charles 1 salle 126

Brief synopsis of The Gut Girls :

The play tells the story of a small community, the “Gut Girls”, who work in a gutting shed at Deptford cattle market, in the South East of London in 1900. This work means they remain at the margins of society, but it also gives them some autonomy, gritty and distasteful as it is: the salary is higher than what women usually get, and they are, up to a point, considered equal to men. Because the work is hard, they use humour and irony to their heart’s content, and try to avoid Lady Helena’s club, which she has set up to teach them how to speak and behave properly. Unfortunately, the cattle market is soon to close, in the wake of progress in refrigerating meat. Each “Gut Girl” will have to find another way to survive: some will marry, most will become servants – and one of them may die as a consequence – and some will find jobs in a factory. Patriarchy, and capitalism, which had been questioned and jeopardised for a time by the small community of the “Gut Girls’, close down upon them, except perhaps one, who now works in a factory where they have a union.

Our Project:

We are a team of six researchers and translators from different universities, and we have set up to translate the play over the last year in a cooperative and collaborative way. We will present our work from different angles: its method (how is it possible for six translators to work together on the same text?), its translation (the play is riddled with puns linked to a particular sociolect, that of the working class in 1900 London) and its historical and literary context (But who are the “Gut Girls, and what does their work tell us?)

                                   Schonell Theatre, 2019

Connecticut Repertory Theatre, 2004

Bref synopsis The Gut Girls :

La pièce retrace le destin d’une petite communauté, celle des « Gut Girls », ouvrières travaillant dans les hangars d’éviscération du Marché aux Bestiaux de Deptford, à la périphérie de Londres, en 1900. Bien que leur activité les relègue en marge de la société, ce labeur peu ragoûtant leur permet de jouir d’une certaine autonomie, car leurs salaires sont supérieurs à ceux ordinairement octroyés aux femmes. Par ailleurs, la nature de leur travail les met sur un relatif pied d’égalité avec les hommes. Pour tenir dans des conditions aussi difficiles, elles manient sans modération l’humour et l’ironie et ne se rendent que sous la contrainte au club que Lady Helena a ouvert pour elles afin de leur inculquer les codes linguistiques et sociaux policés. Tout change avec la fermeture du Marché aux Bestiaux, lorsque la réfrigération naissante permet aux éleveurs de dépecer les bêtes sur place avant de les envoyer découpées alimenter les marchés de Londres. Chaque « Gut Girl » doit trouver un moyen pour survivre : certaines se marient, la plupart des autres entrent en domesticité – l’une d’entre elles le payera peut-être de sa vie -, d’autres vont travailler en usine. L’ordre patriarcal, ici mis en parallèle avec l’ordre capitaliste, un instant déstabilisé par la petite communauté des « Gut Girls » se referme sur elles toutes, à l’exception peut-être de l’une d’entre elles qui rejoint une usine où s’est monté un syndicat.

Notre projet :

Nous sommes une équipe de six enseignantes-chercheuses et traductrices d’universités différentes, qui traduisons la pièce depuis plus d’un an de manière coopérative et collaborative : nous présenterons notre travail sous les différents angles de sa méthode (comment peut-on traduire à six ?), du travail de traduction (en particulier la difficulté de rendre compte d’un sociolecte daté mais aussi des jeux de mots nombreux) et du travail d’analyse historique et littéraire (Qui sont les « Gut Girls » ? que nous raconte leur travail ?).

Séminaire: Adam Wilson (U. Lorraine) “Half British, Half American and Spoken All Over : la constitution idéologique de la langue anglaise en France” Mardi 2 avril 2024 – 18h – site Saint-Charles 1 salle 126

Mardi 2 avril 18h St Charles

Dans cette présentation, je propose d’explorer la « constitution idéologique » de l’objet (socio)linguistique que l’on nomme « l’anglais » en France. Pour ce faire, je mobilise un outillage théorique rassemblant des éléments de la sociolinguistique et de l’analyse du discours afin d’analyser à la fois différents types de textes (documents pédagogiques et officiels, textes touristiques, publicités) et des données issues de travaux de terrain sociolinguistiques entrepris dans divers milieux professionnels. L’analyse montre en quoi des manifestations de certaines idéologies linguistiques dans ces sources brossent un tableau paradoxal de la langue anglaise : d’une part, elle apparaît comme une langue universelle, parlée partout dans le monde, mais, d’autre part, elle est positionnée comme « appartenant » intrinsèquement à deux lieux bien distincts : le Royaume-Uni et/ou les États-Unis. Après avoir identifié, et remis en question, les différentes idéologies linguistiques qui sous-tendent ce paradoxe, j’aborde certaines répercussions sociolinguistiques de ces dynamiques qui contribuent à définir « ce qui compte » comme « l’anglais » en France.

Mots-clefs : idéologies langagières, Agrégation, anglais, native-speakerism, idéologies raciolangagières, purisme, idéologies de langue standard

Adam Wilson est actuellement Maître de conférences au Département de Langues Étrangères Appliquées à l’Université de Lorraine (campus de Metz) et membre de l’Unité de recherche IDEA (UR 2338). Sociolinguiste, ses recherches portent sur les rapports entre phénomènes sociaux et formes et usages linguistiques dans des contextes sociolinguistiques globalisés et globalisants (tourisme, migration transnationale, commerce international, monde universitaire). Ses travaux récents abordent des pratiques, politiques et idéologies linguistiques liées aux langues véhiculaires utilisées dans ces contextes, et notamment l’anglais, explorant également les écarts entre les pratiques langagières dans ces milieux et les modèles de référence mobilisés lors de l’enseignement/apprentissage de l’anglais.
Ce séminaire est ouvert à toutes et à tous

Séminaire (Inter) Agir: “Silences Within and Without the Self. D.H.Lawrence and T.S. Eliot” Kate McLoughlin (Professor of English Literature, University of Oxford)

mardi 9 avril, 18h, St Charles, salle 126

Aldous Huxley called the Twentieth Century ‘the Age of Noise’.  The novelist D. H. Lawrence and the poet T. S. Eliot both listened beyond the noise, to the silence.  Lawrence heard the silences of the body, of power teetering on the brink of fascism.  Eliot heard the silences of spiritual emptiness and of union with the divine.  Both writers turned to non-western religions—Buddhism, Hinduism, the religion of the Aztecs—for illumination.  This talk explores the mystical, thunderous and serene silences that permeate their prose and verse.


Bio (https://www.english.ox.ac.uk/people/professor-kate-mcloughlin ) :
I am both a specialist in post-1900 literature with a particular expertise in war writing and a trans-historicist.

Currently, I am writing a literary history of silence, funded by a Major Research Fellowship from the Leverhulme Trust.  Over eleven centuries of English Literature, silence has had many guises and many hiding-places.  My book will guide readers on a tour taking in the silent states of exile on icy seas described in Anglo-Saxon poems, the hushed intimacy of medieval lullabies, exalted states of blissful union with the divine, the tongue-tied lovers of the Renaissance, spell-binding silent scenes in Shakespeare, encrypted expressions of same-sex love, reason-based reticence, the Romantic sublime, the surprising silences of the garrulous realist novel, the great epics of inarticulable grief, wordless communings with Nature, Modernist depictions of interiority, the failure of words in the face of two World Wars, experiments with visual and acoustic silences in contemporary prose, poetry and drama, and searches for silence in our own Age of Pings.  In the process, I am excavating the intellectual and cultural ideas behind silence and trying to work out how literary silences are formally created.

In tandem with this literary history, I am editing an anthology of poems about and evoking silence, Silence Please, for Bodleian Publishing. I am also thinking about methodologies for theorizing textual silences.  With the historian Suzan Meryam Kalayci and the Ritblat Professor of Mindfulness and Psychological Science, Willem Kuyken, I convene the Silence Hub (SH), an inter-disciplinary, public-facing network for scholars interested in silence. In 2017, I held a Knowledge Exchange Fellowship at the Oxford Quaker Meeting, beginning to learn about silence, spirituality and poetry.

My interest in silence arose from the my work on war writing.  My most recent monograph, Veteran Poetics: British Literature in the Age of Mass Warfare, 1790-2015 (2018), reads the literary war veteran in the literary-philosophical contexts of the age of modern, mass, industrialized warfare, illustrating how ex-combatants have been deployed by authors from William Wordsworth to J. K. Rowling to explore questions relating to being, knowing and communicating.  What can be recovered from the past? Do people stay the same over time? Are there right times of life at which to do certain things? Is there value in experience? How can wisdom be shared?  The final chapter looks at the figure of the silent war veteran – the former fighter who, against expectations, refuses or is unable to tell stories about the wars he has been in – and suggests that this expresses an epistemological crisis central to understanding post-Enlightenment modernity. 

My previous publications include Authoring War: The Literary Representation of War from the Iliad to Iraq (2011), Martha Gellhorn: The War Writer in the Field and in the Text (2007) and, as co-editor and editor, The First World War: Literature, Culture, Modernity (2018), Writing War, Writing Lives (2017) and The Cambridge Companion to War Writing (2009). I am the editor of The Modernist Party (2013), which includes my own essay on why J. Alfred Prufrock is so afraid of going to a tea-party, and co-editor of Memory, Mourning, Landscape (2010) and Tove Jansson Rediscovered (2007). I am also the editor of British Literature in Transition: 1960-1980 – Flower Power, which includes an essay by me on light effects in Philip Larkin’s poetry. I have also published articles and chapters on many other modern and contemporary writers, including Adnan al-Sayegh, Mary Borden, T. S. Eliot, Ford Madox Ford, Allen Ginsberg, Henry James, Tony Kushner, D. H. Lawrence, Dunya Mikhail, Iris Murdoch, Dorothy Richardson, Philip Roth, Edith Wharton and Virginia Woolf.  My articles have appeared in journals such as Critical InquiryEssays in CriticismJournal of Modern Literature and Textual Practice. I regularly review contemporary fiction for the Times Literary Supplement.   

In 2017-18, I co-convened a Mellon-Sawyer international seminar series, Post-War: Commemoration, Reconstruction, Reconciliation from which arose On Commemoration: Global Reflections upon Commemorating War (2020).  To foster scholarly collaboration and collegiality in the field of war representation, in 2010 I co-founded the War and Representation Network (WAR-Net), with Professor Gill Plain of the University of St. Andrews.  WAR-Net now has over 250 members across six continents. With Gill, I am also co-General Editor of the monograph series Edinburgh Critical Studies in War & Culture. We welcome book proposals from scholars at all stages of their careers.  I also founded and co-convene the Writing War research cluster here in the Oxford English Faculty. 

I am particularly interested in supervising dissertations on literature and silence (any aspects), and am also open to proposals on war writing, modernism and post-1900 literature more generally.


Workshop “Language change and variation in English: Methods and frameworks”  – 11 avril 2024

Journée organisée par Ann Coady, Eric Mélac et Florence Floquet

Site St Charles 1 salle 126

L’entrée est libre. Il est également possible d’y assister à distance via le lien zoom suivant : https://univ-montp3-fr.zoom.us/j/99339242289?pwd=dzlCaE9UcnQycDV2NnlEMUdZWDdCQT09

9:30 AM Welcome drinks and opening 

9:45 Eric Mélac (Uni. Paul Valéry), The development of English evidential markers: A case of grammaticalization or constructionalization?

10:45 Debra Ziegeler (Uni. Sorbonne Nouvelle, Uni. Paul Valéry), Can co-optation be replicated in contact? English final discourse particles in New Englishes

12PM Lunch pause

2:00 PM Alessandro Basile (Uni. Sorbonne Nouvelle), What a “pan-stratist” model tells us about modality in contact: A case study from Singapore English 

3:00 Cameron Morin (ENS Lyon), Double modal constructions in Australian and New Zealand English: A computational sociolinguistic survey.

4:00 Marc-Philippe Brunet (Uni. Savoie Mont Blanc), Investigating the social meaning of language variation in the US South: Epistemological elements of sociolinguistic research

5:00 Discussion and conclusion

Séminaire EMMA thème 2 L'(inter)agir – mardi 26 mars 18h – StC salle 126

Susan Blattès (Grenoble-Alpes), Marianne Drugeon (Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3), Claire Hélie (Lille), Marie Nadia Karsky (Paris 8), Estelle Rivier-Arnaud (Grenoble-Alpes), Agathe Torti-Alcayaga (Paris Sorbonne Nord), The Gut Girls BY Sarah Daniels, experiencing collaborative translation

The seminar will be in hybrid and bilingual format, we had much rather you were there with us in the flesh, but do not hesitate to join us on zoom:

https://univ-montp3-fr.zoom.us/j/99954603932?pwd=UUVCRUVDbUNCZmlIRWhQd29vbmo1UT09

Brief synopsis of The Gut Girls :

The play tells the story of a small community, the “Gut Girls”, who work in a gutting shed at Deptford cattle market, in the South East of London in 1900. This work means they remain at the margins of society, but it also gives them some autonomy, gritty and distasteful as it is: the salary is higher than what women usually get, and they are, up to a point, considered equal to men. Because the work is hard, they use humour and irony to their heart’s content, and try to avoid Lady Helena’s club, which she has set up to teach them how to speak and behave properly. Unfortunately, the cattle market is soon to close, in the wake of progress in refrigerating meat. Each “Gut Girl” will have to find another way to survive: some will marry, most will become servants – and one of them may die as a consequence – and some will find jobs in a factory. Patriarchy, and capitalism, which had been questioned and jeopardised for a time by the small community of the “Gut Girls’, close down upon them, except perhaps one, who now works in a factory where they have a union.

Our Project:

We are a team of six researchers and translators from different universities, and we have set up to translate the play over the last year in a cooperative and collaborative way. We will present our work from different angles: its method (how is it possible for six translators to work together on the same text?), its translation (the play is riddled with puns linked to a particular sociolect, that of the working class in 1900 London) and its historical and literary context (But who are the “Gut Girls, and what does their work tell us?)

                                   Schonell Theatre, 2019

Connecticut Repertory Theatre, 2004

Lily Robert-Foley (MCF, EMMA) : “The history and future of an alternative, oppositional translation practice.” Mardi 12 mars 2024 – Site Saint-Charles salle 126

The threat of machine translation has given way to an alternative, experimental practice of translation that reflects upon and hijacks traditional paradigms. In much the same way that photography initiated a break in artistic practices with the threat of an absolute fidelity to the real, machine translation has paradoxically liberated human translators to err, to diverge, to tamper with the original, blurring creation and imitation with cyborg collage and appropriation. Seven chapters reimagine seven classic “procedures” of translation theory and pedagogy: borrowing, calque, literal translation, transposition, modulation, equivalence, and adaptation, updating them for the material political and poetic concerns of the contemporary era. Each chapter combines reflections from translation studies and experimental literature with practical guides, sets of experimental translation “procedures” to try at home or abroad, in the classroom, the laboratory, the garden, the dance hall, the city, the kitchen, the library, the shopping center, the supermarket, the train, the bus, the airplane, the post office, on the radio, on your phone, on your computer, and on the internet.

Journée d’Etudes – Susan Galspell: Past & Present

Jeudi 7 et vendredi 8 décembre 2023 – Université Toulouse Jean Jaurès

ACT (Anglophone Contemporary Theatre), événement co-organisé par Marianne Drugeon (EMMA), Emeline Jouve (CAS), Sophie Maruejouls-Koch (CAS) et Déborah Prudhon (LERMA)

https://cas.univ-tlse2.fr/accueil-cas/seminaires/susan-glaspell-past-present-journees-detude-act-anglophone-contemporary-theatre

JEUDI DÉCEMBRE 7 (BÂTIMENT ERASME, CRL) 

14h30-17h15 Présentation d’ouvrages 

J. Ellen Gainor (Cornell Univ.), Susan Glaspell in Context (Cambridge University Press, 2023) Discutante : E. Jouve, Univ. Toulouse – Jean Jaurès 

Aurélie Delevalée (trad. Indépendante), Julie Vatain-Corfdir (Sorbonne Univ.), Sophie Maruejouls-Koch, Emeline Jouve (Univ. Toulouse Jean Jaurès), Trifles/Peccadilles, The Outside/De l’Autre côté, Woman’s Honor/L’Honneur d’une femme de Susan Glaspell (Presses Universitaires du Midi, 2023) Discutante : Nathalie Rivère de Carles, Univ. Toulouse – Jean Jaurès 

Noelia Hernando-Real (Univ. Autónoma de Madrid), Rosas en la arena. Los relatos de Susan Glaspell(Publicaciones Universidad de Valencia, 2022) Discutante : N. Alberola Crespo, Univ. Jaume I 

Pause 

Nieves Alberola Crespo (Univ. Jaume I), Susan Glaspell: teatro, vanguardia y humor (1917-1918) (Publicaciones Universidad de Valencia, 2022) Discutante : N. Hernando-Real, Univ. Autónoma de Madrid 

Marcia Noe (Univ. of Tennessee), Three Midwestern Playwrights: How Floyd Dell, George Cram Cook, and Susan Glaspell Transformed American Theatre (Indiana University Press, 2022) Discutant : D. Eisenhauer, Univ. Le Havre Normandie 

17h15-18h Cocktail 

17h18-18h30 Lecture bilingue de Trifles, S. Glaspell par la Cie Les Sœurs Fatales 

Lectr.ice.eur.s : Marina Dirar, Maryam Dos Anjos, Jeremy Eckerling, Théo Lasaygues ; Mise en voix : Anne Cameron

VENDREDI DÉCEMBRE 8 (MAISON DE LA RECHERCHE, SALLE E412)

9h-9h45Conférence plénière Modération : E. Jouve, Univ. Toulouse – Jean Jaurès 

J. Ellen Gainor (Cornell Univ.), Susan Glaspell, Actor

9h45-10h45 Atelier 1 Modération : M. Drugeon, Univ. Paul-Valéry

Thierry Dubost (Univ. de Caen), Trifles: Cherry Preserves to Alleviate the Bitter Taste of Loneliness

Amanda J. Nelson (Virginia Tech Univ.), A Jury of Her Peers: Reflections and Remembrances of Susan Glaspell and the Provincetown Players

Pause 

11h-12h Atelier 2 Modération : S. Maruejouls-Koch, Univ. Toulouse – Jean Jaurès 

Noelia Hernando-Real (Univ. Autónoma de Madrid), Susan Glaspell and the Medical Humanities

Alessandra Calanchi (Univ. of Urbino Carlo Bo, Italy), Landscapes Matter: Environmental Epiphanies in Lifted Masks

13h30-14h15 Entretien Modération : J. Ellen Gainor, (Cornell Univ.) 

Martha C. Carpentier (Seton Hall Univ.), Barbara Ozieblo (Univ. de Málaga) and Noelia Hernando-Real (Univ. Autónoma de Madrid) : On the International Susan Glaspell Society

14h15-15h15Atelier 3 Modération : D. Prudhon, Univ. Aix-Marseille 

Nieves Alberola Crespo (Universitat Jaume I de Castelló, Spain), The Challenge of Performing Woman´s Honor in the 21st century

Nora Grimes (Trinity College), The Outside Looking In: Transnational Depictions of Women and the Natural World in Plays by Susan GlaspellLady Gregory, and Dorothy Macardle

Pause 

15h30-16h30 Atelier 4 Modération : N. Hernando-Real, Univ. Autónoma de Madrid 

Alex Roe (directeur artistique du Metropolitan Playhouse, NY), Writing for «Living Beings»: Lessons Learned Producing Susan Glaspell and the Provincetown Players in a Plague Year 

Milbre Burch (playwright and independent scholar), Art as Activism: Utilizing an Adaptation of Susan Glaspell’s Trifles for Community Outreach with Domestic Violence Survivors, Shelters and Service Providers

Pause 

16h45-17h15 Lecture de Close the Book, S. Glaspell Mise en voix : Alex Roe