Archives de l’auteur : Marc Lenormand

Séminaire “Locating the Self: Welcoming the Other in British and Irish Art, 1990–2020”

Mardi 7 november 2023 à 18h, Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3, site Saint-Charles, salle 126.

Séminaire inaugural. Intervention de Valérie Morisson.

Valérie Morisson will present her volume Locating the Self: Welcoming the Other in British and Irish Art, 1990–2020 (Peter Lang, 2022). This volume addresses how spatialized identities, belongingness and hospitality are interrogated in British and Irish contemporary art (painting, installation, video, photography, new public art) at a time when economic and political crises tend to encourage individual or exclusive usages of space. It sketches a cartography of encounters encompassing the home, the neighbourhood, the village or city, and the nation. Artists interrogate how intimacy is both facilitated and threatened by spatial devices, how space fashions our perception of gender, social or ethnic identity and activates power relations. They explore the need for a home or a homeland and the various forms exile or placelessness can take. They may also take part in the restoration of the Commons and the constitution of alternative communities. Whether the analyses focus on the private sphere (in urban, suburban or rural contexts), or on shared communal spaces, they ponder the mechanisms of inclusion and exclusion at work in human encounters and shed light on how artistic apparatuses make the tensions between openness to the other and rejection or withdrawal perceptible. The approach, borrowing from art history as well as anthropology, lays emphasis on context, situationality and field work; it proposes to repoliticize relational art and concludes on the dialogical positionality which lies at the core of art.

Valérie Morisson is a Professor of British and Irish Studies at Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3 and a member of EMMA. She has studied Irish contemporary art and its relation with post-nationalist culture extensively and has published many academic texts on British contemporary art. Though firmly anchored in art history, her approach stresses the relevance of context in the understanding of visual culture and the arts and borrows from anthropology to shed light on the position of the artist as well as the role of art in society. Her publications focus on a wide range of subjects (feminist art, memory and the commemoration of history, the Northern-Irish situation, postcolonial art, lens-based art) and consistently emphasize field work and praxis in art as key vehicles for expression, analysis and critique.

Colloque “Foreign Bodies: Becoming Apart, Becoming a Part in Contemporary Literature”

12-13 October 2023

Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3, Site Saint Charles, Salle des colloques 2

Organisers: Katia Marcellin and Carine Nibakure.

PROGRAMME

Thursday 12th October 2023

9.45: Welcome coffee

10.30: Opening of the conference by Jean-Michel Ganteau, co-director of EMMA, and the organisers.

PANEL 1: Uncontained Bodies. Chair: Héloïse Lecomte (ENS Lyon)

10.50: Constance Pompié (Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3) – “Contagious Bodies in Sarah Hall’s Burntcoat

11.15: Nodhar Hammami Ben Fradj (University of Kairouan) – “Foreign Female Bodies in Sarah Waters’s Tipping the Velvet: From Victorian Exclusion to Contemporary Inclusion”

– 11.40: Discussion

12.25-2.25 pm: Lunch

PANEL 2: Becoming Hybrid Bodies. Chair: Monica Michlin (Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3)

2.25: Quitterie de Beauregard (Sorbonne Université) – “‘Xenogenesis’: Alien Bodies, Community and Identity in Octavia Butler’s Post-Apocalyptic Rebirth Stories”

2.50: Himangshu Sarma (Gauhati University) – “Embodied Empathy and the Boundaries of Humanity in Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Sower (1993)”

– 3.15: Discussion

3.40-4.10: Coffee break

KEYNOTE LECTURE 1

Harry Parker: “Dreams of a Broken Body”. Chair: Catherine Bernard (Université Paris Cité) – 4.10-4.30

4.30: Discussion with Catherine Bernard + the audience.

5.00: Interview with the Graduate students of English Literature at Paul Valéry University.

8 pm: Dinner in town

Friday 13th October 2023

10.15-10.50: Welcome coffee

PANEL 3: Bodies in Crisis and Vulnerable Belongings. Chair: Isabelle Brasme (Université de Nîmes)

10h50: Héloïse Lecomte (ENS Lyon) – “Private Grief, National Crisis: Salena Godden’s Embodied Politics of Mourning in Mrs Death Misses Death (2021)”

11.15: Laurent Trèves (ENS Lyon) – “Loneliness as Dis-Integration in Jon McGregor’s Even the Dogs

11.40: Maxence Gouleau (Sorbonne Université) – “In/Excluding Pregnancy/ies in Pat Barker’s The Women of Troy (2021), Jessie Greengrass’s Sight (2018) and Julie Myerson’s Sleepwalking (1994)”

12.05: Discussion

12.30-2 pm: Lunch

PANEL 4: Dis-placed Bodies: Configuring New Bodily Spaces. Chair: Vanessa Guignery (ENS Lyon

2.00: Jaine Chemmachery (Sorbonne Université)– “The Refugee Tales: Bearing witness to the plight of refugees through literary and artistic re-incorporation”.

– 2.25: Sarah Back (University of Innsbruck) – “Navigating the Non-White, Non-Male Body Through Online Spaces: Ch. N. Adichie’s and B. Evaristo’s Intermedial Body Narratives”

2.50: Mohan Dharavath (Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Hyberabad) “Adivasi Studies vis-à-vis Literary Postmodernism in India: Disrupting the Norm Through Memory, Intersectionality and Critique”.

– 3.15: Discussion

3.40-4.10: Coffee break

KEYNOTE LECTURE 2
Catherine Bernard (Université Paris Cité)

“Becoming subject(s): of Part(s), Whole(s) and Multitude(s) in Contemporary British Fiction”

Chair: Jean-Michel Ganteau (Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3) – 4.10-5.30

——————————————————————————————————————————-

Organising Committee: Lise Lefebvre, Katia Marcellin, Carine Nibakure and Joséphine Sourgnes.

Scientific Committee: Isabelle Brasme, Jean-Michel Ganteau, Georges Letissier, Katia Marcellin, Judith Misrahi-Barak, Carine Nibakure, Vanessa Guignery.

International conference organised with the support of Doctoral School 58 and the Department of Anglophone Studies of Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3.

Séminaire EMMA / « Poetry Talks » : Craig Dworkin, « The Materiality of Infrastructure: On Virtual Libraries »

Mardi 10 octobre 2023, 18h, Salle 126 Site Saint-Charles 1. Séance animée par Lily Robert-Foley (MCF, EMMA).

This talk contextualizes the hybrid text of Helicography (Punctum Books, 2021) – part art-historical essay, part experimental fiction, part pataphysical investigation – by considering the practical and theoretical limits of digital libraries and their implications for scholarly and creative work in the age of the fibre-optics.

Craig Dworkin is the author of four scholarly monographs – Reading the Illegible (Northwestern), No Medium (MIT), Dictionary Poetics: Toward a Radical Lexicography (Fordham), and Radium of the Word: a Poetics of Materiality (Chicago) – as well as a half-dozen edited collections and a dozen books of experimental writing, including, most recently, The Pine-Woods Notebook (Kenning Editions) and Helicography (Punctum). He teaches literary history and theory at the University of Utah.

Séminaire EMMA : Conférence de Philip Metres (John Caroll University, USA) « Erasing Erasures: On Documents & Lyric in Poetry »

Mardi 3 octobre 2023, 18h, Salle 126 Site Saint-Charles 1. Conférence animée par Karim Daanoune (MCF, EMMA)

The work of documentary/investigative poetry parallels the work of truth commissions—not only by gathering testimonies that haven’t been aired widely, but also by examining, working with, and critiquing the political, legal, economic, and cultural systems that engineer oppression and injustice. A truth commission is a transitional justice mechanism for societies attempting to confront the past, reestablish the rule of law and responsible governance, and move into the future. Lacking an official truth process, artists and activists create a counterarchive, undoing erasure, and making visible and audible histories that the official narratives suppress or exclude. If archives began as a way of maintaining hegemony’s memory through written records, the counterarchive is more flexible, more fluid, more vivacious, less bound to documents—a laughing memory, a funeral dance, a mapped songline, worn prayer beads passed down. This talk will explore the origins and implications of this idea through some of my recent work in investigative poetry—from Sand Opera, Shrapnel Maps, and Fugitive/Refuge.

Philip Metres is the author of many books among which the poetry collections To See the Earth (Cleveland State, 2008), Sand Opera (Alice James, 2015), Pictures at an Exhibition (University of Akron, 2016) and Shrapnel Maps (Copper Canyon, 2020). He also published a collection of essays on poetry entitled The Sound of Listening: Poetry as Refuge and Resistance (University of Michigan, 2018) and a scholarly monograph Behind the Lines: War Resistance Poetry on the American Homefront, Since 1941 ( University of Iowa Press, 2007). Philip also translated from the Russian Sergey Gandlevsky’s poetry in a bilingual edition A Kindred Orphanhood: Selected Poems of Sergey Gandlevsky (Zephyr Press, 2003). He also co-translated with Tatiana Tulchinsky two volumes, one on the poetry of Arseny Tarkovsky (1907-1989), I Burned at Feast: Selected Poems of Arseny Tarkovsky (Cleveland State University, 2015) and another on poetic texts by Lev Rubinstein, Compleat Catalogue of Comedic Novelties: Poetic Texts of Lev Rubinstein (Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014). His latest translation Ochre & Rust: New Selected Poems of Sergey Gandlevsky has just been released by Green Linden Press. His forthcoming poetry collection Fugitive Refuge will be published in April 2024 by Copper Canyon. His work was awarded many prizes among which the Adrienne Rich Award and three disctinctions by the Arab American Book Awards.

Philip Metres teaches literature and creative writing at John Carroll University in University Heights, Ohio. He is the founder and director of the “Peace, Justice, and Human Rights (PJHR)” at John Carroll University. He lives in Cleveland.

Plus de renseignements sur : https://poetry-talks.weebly.com/

Colloque “Maîtres des horloges? Pouvoir, autorité et temporalité(s) en culture de l’écran”

Jeudi 28 et vendredi 29 septembre 2023 à l’Auditorium, site Saint-Charles 2, Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3.

Colloque organisé par Hervé Mayer et Monica Michlin (EMMA EA 741, Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3), Arnaud Regnauld (TransCrit, Université Paris-8), Hélène Machinal (ACE, Université Rennes-2), Camille Manfredi (HCTI, UBO), Mélanie Joseph-Vilain et Shannon Wells-Lassagne (TIL, Université de Bourgogne) et Elaine Després (Figura, UQAM).

PROGRAMME

Jeudi 28 septembre 2023

9h30 : accueil et café de bienvenue

9h45 : ouverture du colloque

10h11h : Conférence plénière en littérature américaine : Sylvie Bauer (Rennes 2), discutant Arnaud Regnauld (Paris8)

11h-11h20 : pause

Atelier 1 : Littérature et écrans. Modération : Karim Daanoune (UPVM)

11h20-11h50 : Hanna Hadjadj (Paris-8) : Fuir le totalitarisme par le Mind Upload : d’entremêlements polychroniques à dystopie dans Skin Elegies de Lance Olsen.

11h50-12h20 : Christelle Centi (UBO) : Maîtresses de l’horloge : maternités monstrueuses dans les représentations de Münchhausen par procuration, entre roman, non-fiction, et écran.

12h20-12h50 : Antonin Premillieu (AMU) : Philip K. Dick et la science-fiction à l’ère de l’information.

13h-14h25 : déjeuner

Atelier 2 : Arts plastiques, simulation VR, stop motion. Modération : Arnaud Regnauld (Paris8)

14h30-15h : Gina Cortopassi (UQAM) : Uchronie, capitalisme et plastique : une étude de l’œuvre Material Speculation de Morehshin Allahyari.

15h-15h30 : Hortense Boulais-Ifrène (Paris-8) : La disparition d’AltSpaceVR. 15h30-15h50 : pause-café

15h50-16h20 : Anthony Morin-Hébert (UQAM) : Mad God ou l’inévitable déchéance de l’humanité.

Atelier 3 : Agentivité et espoir ?

16h20-16h50 : Mounir Tairi (AMU) : « Horizons of Horror and Hope » : Autorité, agentivité et (a) temporalités apocalyptiques.

Dîner en ville à 19h30.

Vendredi 29 septembre 2023

9h30 accueil

Atelier 4 : Séries télévisées et uchronies politiques. Modération : Hélène Machinal (Rennes2)

9h45-10h15 : Jessy Neau (Centre Universitaire de Mayotte) : La stratégie du choc : la série 1983 comme anti-récit de la transition démocratique des pays à l’Est du rideau de fer.

10h15-10h45 : Élaine Després (UQAM) : Le train du fascisme arrive toujours à l’heure : Le pouvoir et ses temporalités dans la série Snowpiercer.

10h45-11h15 : Anne-Lise Marin-Lamellet (U. Jean-Monnet) : « One family, fighting the future » : Years and Years (Russell T. Davies, 2019).

11h15-11h45 : pause-café

11h4512h45 : Conférence plénière de Ludivine Bantigny. Discutante : Monica Michlin (UPVM)

12h45-14h : déjeuner

Atelier 5 : Anthropocène et temporalités au prisme écologique. Modération : Camille Manfredi (UBO)

14h-14h30 : Gaëlle Debeaux (Rennes-2) : La crise qui advient : peut-on regarder le présent en face ? Sidération du présent et émergence de contrepouvoirs dans quelques récits (post)- apocalyptiques contemporains.

14h30-15h00 : Julie Fortin (UPVD) : Remise en cause d’une temporalité hégémonique dans un récit de catastrophe écologique : analyse du film Maggie de Yi Ok-seop (2019).

15h-15h20 : pause-café

Atelier 6 : Métatextualité et temps préécrit ? Modération : Monica Michlin (UPVM)

15h20-15h50 : Louis-Paul Willis (UQAT) : Le futur comme prison ? Pouvoir, agentivité et rétrocausalité dans la série Flashforward.

15h50-16h20 : Hervé Mayer (UPVM) : Se libérer des récits pré-écrits : le pouvoir émancipateur de la métafiction dans la saison 1 de Loki.

Clôture du colloque à 16h30

Séminaire “Telling America’s Story to the World”

Mardi 12 septembre 2023, 18h, Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3, salle 126 (Saint-Charles 1) et visioconférence

Séminaire organisé par Raphaël Ricaud dans le cadre de l’axe « Faire commun » d’EMMA. Intervention de Harilaos Stecopoulos (University of Iowa).

In Telling America’s Story to the World (Oxford University Press, 2023), Harilaos Stecopoulos argues that state and state-affiliated cultural diplomacy contributed to the making of postwar US literature. Highlighting the role of liberal internationalism in US cultural outreach, Harilaos Stecopoulos contends that the state mainly sent authors like Ralph Ellison, Robert Frost, William Faulkner, Langston Hughes, and Maxine Hong Kingston overseas not just to demonstrate the achievements of US civilization but also to broadcast an American commitment to international cross-cultural connection. Those writers-cum-ambassadors may not have helped the state achieve its propaganda goals-indeed, this rarely proved the case-but they did find their assignments an opportunity to ponder the international meanings and possibilities of US literature. For many of those figures, courting foreign publics inspired a reevaluation of the scope and form of their own literary projects. Testifying to the inadvertent yet integral role of cultural diplomacy in the worlding of US letters, works like The Mansion (1959), Life Studies (1959), “Cultural Exchange” (1961, 1967), Tripmaster Monkey: His Fake Book (1989), and Three Days Before the Shooting… (2010) reimagine US literature in a mobile, global, and distinctly political register.

Présentation de l’intervenant: Harilaos Stecopoulos is an Associate Professor of English at the University of Iowa. He earned his doctorate at the University of Virginia and is a renowned scholar in the field of US literature and culture. Stecopoulos’s previous books include: A History of the Literature of the US South (2021), Reconstructing the World: Southern Fictions and US Imperialisms (2008), & Race and the Subject of Masculinities (1997).

Participer à la réunion Zoom : https://univ-montp3-fr.zoom.us/j/93144920976?pwd=QmJ5cHpzb25FM0hpSUg0U2RTdGR3QT09

CFP “From 1984 to 2024: industrial disputes and social movements in the United Kingdom since the Great Miners’ Strike”

Call for papers

This CFP concerns submissions: 

  • For a one-day conference entitled “From 1984 to 2024: industrial disputes and social movements in the UK since the Great Miners’ Strike” which will take place in Sciences Po Lille (France) on March 6th, 2024
  • For an issue of the French journal of British Studies / Revue française de civilisation britannique (RFCB) on the same theme, to be published in late 2024

Please see below for the submission guidelines for the one-day conference and the journal issue. 

The one-day conference and journal issue focus on the past four decades of industrial disputes and social movements in the UK. The year 2024 is indeed the 40th anniversary of the beginning of the Great Miners’ Strike of 1984-1985. As such, it provides an opportunity to study social protest in the UK since 1984. 

This fortieth anniversary allows for several reflexive operations. First, one can look at the 1984-2024 period as a whole, and identify dynamics of social protest in the UK since the Great Miners’ Strike. Then, taking as a starting point the strike wave that began in the Winter of 2022 and comparing the early 2020s with the early 1980s, one may survey the transformations undergone by the UK over the past four decades. Finally, the 2024 anniversary calls for a reflection on the commemorations of the Great Miners’ Strike. It has become one of the main sites of memory [lieux de mémoire] (Nora, 1989) of the British trade-union movement, but has also become a point of reference for other social movements. 

This anniversary therefore serves both as the driver of a series of questions on the recent history of social struggle in the UK, and as a heuristic device for observers of contemporary British society. The journal issue intends to encourage retrospective, bird-eye views on the variegated forms of social protest since the watershed of the Great Miners’ Strike, as well as to shed light on the current conjuncture, by identifying parallels and differences between now and 1984.

The outline that follows offers to contributors a series of reflections, whose aim is to spark discussion rather than foreclose it. It does not intend to exhaust the possible interrogations and objects of study relating to these forty years of strife in the UK. While some hypotheses are offered, contributions tackling this field of inquiry from perspectives omitted in this CFP will be welcome.

Contributions may focus on the following questions or more:

  • The 1984-2024 period as a whole
  • Specific protest events
  • Specific social movements: trade-unionism, ecological struggles, feminism, etc
  • Specific organisations and/or actors
  • Forms of collective action
  • Modalities, moments or places of articulation/convergence between various struggles/movements
  • Historicity of struggles and movements

Submission guidelines

This is a two-step project:

  • 500-word abstracts for the conference should be sent by October 31st 2023: they will be reviewed by the Scientific Committee of the March 6th 2024 conference “40 years of Strife: industrial disputes and social movements in the UK since the Great Miners’ Strike”. The conference will allow for discussion of in-progress articles and/or fully-written articles. 
  • Full articles submitted for the French Journal of British Studies/RFCB issue will be expected for May 31th 2024: they will be reviewed by the Scientific Committee

Taking part in the March 6th conference is neither a condition for nor a guarantee of publication in the French Journal of British Studies/RFCB journal issue. Both abstracts and subsequent articles should be sent to Clémence Fourton (Sciences Po Lille, CECILLE: clemence.fourton@sciencespo-lille.eu) and Marc Lenormand (Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3, EMMA: Marc.Lenormand@univ-montp3.fr) 

Scientific Committee

  • Emmanuelle Avril, Université Sorbonne Nouvelle, CREW
  • David Bailey, University of Birmingham
  • Emma Bell, Université Savoie Mont-Blanc, LLSETI
  • Oscar Berglund, University of Bristol
  • Mathilde Bertrand, Université Bordeaux Montaigne, CLIMAS
  • Bernd Bonfert, Aarhus Universitet
  • Charles Devellennes, Kent University
  • Thierry Labica, Université Paris Nanterre, CREA
  • Marie-Violaine Louvet, Université Toulouse Jean-Jaurès, CAS
  • Claire Mansour, Université Toulouse Jean-Jaurès, CAS
  • Jacob Mukherjee, Goldsmiths’ College
  • John Mullen, Université de Rouen, ERIAC

Detailed project presentation

1. The Great Miners’ Strike, the anti-union consensus and the neutralisation of collective action

The 1984-1985 Great Miners’ Strike was a key moment in the deployment of the anti-union arsenal which had been patiently crafted by the Conservatives after the defeats of the Heath Government in the face of national miners’ strikes in 1972 and 1974, and implemented by the Thatcher government from her election in 1979. Passing anti-union laws, reorganising the police and placing an anti-union chairman at the head of the National Coal Board: much was done to break the union which was rightly perceived as the most militant, and the most able to combat the imposition of the neoliberal restructuring of the British economy (Beynon, 1985). After the landslide victory of the Conservative in 1983 and the miners’ defeat in 1984-1985, Margaret Thatcher’s second term was marked by the rollout of a radical neoliberal agenda (Holmes, 1989).

a. New perspectives on the Great Miners’ Strike

Along with the 1926 general strike, the Great Miners’ Strike is the industrial conflict of British history which has been the most extensively discussed (in print or otherwise), be it in academic publications, militant histories or fictional productions (Bertrand et al, 2016). This vast production, which started during the strike and has expanded with each of its anniversaries, now constitutes an object of inquiry of itself: how have militant and academic readings of the Great Miners’ Strike evolved since 1984?

This large body of work notwithstanding, there is still ample room for new research on the Great Miners’ Strike, in particular since government archives of the period were released less than a decade ago, and since academic fields such as labour history and industrial relations have experienced a renewal over the past twenty years. These fields have particularly benefited from new perspectives offered by gender studies and critical race studies. In short, this journal issue and conference do not regard the Great Miners’ Strike and its anniversary as a pretext, quite to the contrary. Original contributions on this foundational moment are most welcome. 

b. The neutralisation of collective action and the development of an anti-union consensus

The Great Miners’ Strike is to be understood within the historical development of an anti-union consensus, in the sense that collective action by workers has been delegitimised and that a wide array of devices have been developed to neutralise it, altogether legal, institutional, financial and managerial (Christoph et al, 2019; Howell, 2005). This dynamic started the decade before the strike, with early attempts at curtailing industrial action such as Harold Wilson’s Labour government’s White Paper In Place of Strife (1969) and the Industrial relations Act (1971) being passed by the Conservatives. These two initiatives were met with strong trade-union resistance. They also paved the way for the anti-union rhetoric and agenda articulated by the new Thatcherite leadership of the Conservative party and its media allies in the second half of the 1970s (Hay, 1996). This anti-union dynamic reached full steam in the 1980s, when the Conservatives pushed for legislation limiting trade-union action and supported the reassertion of management control (Taylor, 1993). The Great Miners’ Strike was followed by the Wapping dispute (1986), which succeeded in crushing unions in the print industry (Bain, 1998). Most importantly, the Conservative victories against the trade-unions in the mid-1980s heralded a new era of anti-union consensus, which the following Labour governments (1997-2010) were not able or willing to bring to an end (Daniels & McIlroy, 2009; Dixon, 2000; Mullen, 2009). As a result, the anti-union arsenal which had been developed by the Thatcher governments, rather than being reduced, has been further expanded by the Conservatives since 2010 (Scott & Williams 2014). 

This chronology raises a series of questions: what was the role of the Great Miners’ Strike in the development of an anti-union consensus in the UK? Is it relevant to regard the mid-1980s as a watershed in the anti-union consensus era? How did the anti-union consensus stabilise after this decisive battle with the most militant components of the British industrial movement? Who or what have been the drivers, the causes, the motivations and the effects of this consensus (Labica, 2015)?

Conversely, should we be wary of overstating this anti-union consensus and the neutralisation of collective action? How significant are divergences within mainstream discourse (in government, executive boardrooms, newsrooms), as well as the existence of counter-discourses and counter-narratives, such as the rallying effect, in the British left and in some working-class communities, of a deep-seated hatred for M. Thatcher and her policies? 

2. The transformations of social movements between 1984 and 2024 

The 1984-1985 Great Miners’ Strike points at two paradoxical dynamics. On the one hand, as the moment when the militant National Union of Mineworkers (NUM) was broken, it stands as an important step in the gradual decrease of trade-union membership figures, after their peak in the late 1970s, and in the concomitant marginalisation of trade-unions in culture, politics, economic policy and industrial relations. On the other hand, when the Great Miners’ Strike took place, a series of non-industrial protest movement had been growing in numbers and strength since the beginning of the 1970s, in particular the women’s liberation movement and the lesbian and gay liberation movement, whose participation in and support for the Miners’ Strike is now well documented (Cabadi, 2023; Stead, 1987). The paradox of the Great Miners’ Strike is therefore that, as the industrial conflict par excellence, it also reminds us that trade-union action is one aspect of social protest. Studying the 1984-2024 period therefore implies considering the evolution of the British trade-union movement relative to other, non-industrial protest movements, and the logics of displacement, substitution, convergence or divergence between them.

a. From trade-union marginalisation to social protest displacement?

The British trade-union movement’s ability to act as a counterweight to government and company management was reduced. It was diminished as a vehicle for obtaining better living conditions and transforming the social and political order. In this context, one can wonder whether the emergence of the anti-union consensus and of the neutralisation of collective industrial action have produced transformations of social protest. Has the centre of gravity of protest moved away from trade-union action into other spaces of collective action, and if so, which ones? 

Can the riots which have taken place in the UK (and elsewhere) from the 1980s onwards be regarded as a product and a manifestation of the transformation of social protest, bearing in mind that interpreting their politics is both difficult and potentially reductive (Žižek, 2011)? Should riots be regarded differently when they are associated with explicit demands, such as the Poll Tax Riot (1990), when they take the form of predominantly White working-class hooliganism, or when they express, as in some English cities in 2011, a “generalised feeling of injustice” on the part of marginalised populations, relating to poverty, police brutality and racism, and government policy all at once (Lewis et al, 2011)?

What about the development, from 2010 onwards, of an anti-austerity citizens’ movement, in a broader context of “movements of the crisis” (Della Porta & Mattoni, 2014) after the 2008 financial crisis and the public spending reduction policies that followed it in numerous countries (Bailey et al, 2022)? In the UK, this multifarious anti-austerity movement brought together new campaign groups and pre-existing organisations (Fourton, 2018). It marked a significant increase of social conflict levels, and was characterised as marking a new cycle of protest (Bailey 2018). Is there, then, insofar as they all responded to a “crisis of care” (Brown et al, 2013: 79), a form of continuity and/or convergence between, on the one hand, this anti-austerity movement, the students’ movement and the Occupy protests, and, on the other hand, the trade-union movement? With trade-union membership levels relatively low, should the anti-austerity movement instead be regarded as a form of substitute for trade-union action taken up by campaigners faced with critical assaults on social rights? Has trade-union action, reliant on majority support at workplace or industry level, been replaced by extra-institutional collective action, which can be undertaken by minority groups while aspiring to precipitate change in a prefigurative logic (Ribera-Almandoz et al, 2020)? Cammaerts (2018) considers that it is the anti-austerity movement which has most clearly articulated a counter-hegemony in the face of the neoliberal consensus in the period opened by the Great financial crisis. This suggests that trade-union action is no longer regarded as the prime tool to challenge the economic and social order, and that opposition to neoliberalism is now taking place elsewhere. 

If this reading of social protest as having changed actors, spaces and modalities is correct, does it signal a deep reconfiguration of struggles in a repressive neoliberal context? Is it rather the sign of a welcome rebalancing away from the attention received by industrial action? Or, conversely, is it simply that spectacular forms of actions attract more media and academic attention?

b. The space of social movements and its reconfigurations between 1984 and 2024

Building on Mathieu’s (2007) concept, social movements can be regarded as being part of a relatively autonomous space of social movements. The specific configuration of the space of social movements we are concerned with depends on the social movements which emerged and/or remained active during the 1984-2024 period. The list is manifold and open-ended. To give only a few examples, this includes the peace and nuclear disarmament movement, the environmental movement, the feminist movement, the LGBT+ movement, the disabled people’s movements, the anti-austerity movement, the pro- and anti-European union movements, the nationalist and pro-independence movements.

Besides, any analysis of social movements in the UK over the 1984-2024 period needs to take into account the territorial specificities of this multi-national space and its many dividing lines. Such an analysis should also account for constitutional and identity issues, which have polarised public debate and affected people’s daily lives, sometimes dramatically so. The 1984-2024 period indeed spans the end of the military phase of the Northern Irish conflict and the Peace process, the devolution process and its redistribution of power and institutional weight away from the English centre towards minority nations, and the constitutional decade of the 2010s dominated by the Scottish and EU referendums. All these processes, although institutional and constitutional, are not separate from the space of social movements, where they continue or indeed sometimes commence, and as such raise, once again, the question of how movements have appeared and evolved in the UK since 1984. How has the space of social movements been affected by the emergence of new constitutional or identity questions, and the institutional evolutions they have provoked? 

Part of the ambition of this project is to draw up panoramas, cartographies and chronologies of social protest in the UK and of some specific movements over the past 40 years. Beyond the identification and the analysis of such movements and their (relatively) autonomous trajectories, contributions aiming at discerning parallel and intertwining chronologies will be especially welcome: have these different movements met, politically, materially or otherwise? If so, under which conditions did such junctions happen? Did the Labour Party under the leadership of Jeremy Corby (2015-2020) play such a role as a meeting ground (Labica, 2019)? Has such convergence relied on negative common denominators, such as anti-Thatcherism, or on common, positive ground such as demands for social, economic or ecological justice? Materially, as well as ideologically, is social protest structured in networks, around individual or organisational nodes? In other words, what does the dynamic space of social movements look like in the UK, and within which inter- or transnational protest spaces should it be considered, if any? 

3. Discussing the strike wave of the early 2020s: are trade-unions back?

Studying the contemporary period in light of the mid-1980s highlights parallels (between actors, repertoires of contention, discourses) as well as divergences. Against the idea of a progressive disappearance of trade-union action, the strike wave which started in the UK in the Winter of 2022 can indeed be seen as a comeback of industrial struggles, the latter having not just lost in intensity after the mid-1980s but even continuously decreased, all the way down to a historical low point in the mid-2010s (Lenormand, 2022). With strikes multiplying, “the working-class is back”, to quote Mick Lynch, the General Secretary of the RMT union.

This being said, the forms taken by trade-union action in the current strike wave clearly speak to the new social, political and economic configuration of the UK in the early 2020s: there is and will be no going back to 1984. The strike wave which has been sweeping both private companies and public services has had no match in extent and duration since the 1970s. It is, above all, the largest and most significant outburst of strike action since the anti-union consensus was imposed and stabilised in the 1980 and 1990. It therefore calls for an interrogation of the forms that industrial action takes in this anti-union context, and for an analysis of the organisational and ideological transformations that the trade-union movement has undergone over the past four decades.

a. Industrial action in an adverse environment

The strike wave which started in the UK in the Winter of 2021-2022 has enthused activists, put bread and butter issues and industrial relations back on the public agenda and triggered much commentary from journalists and academics alike. These strikes display, however, a number of limits. First, they actually consist in a large number of local or sectorial disputes. These are grounded in and curtailed to specific companies or industries, because of the anti-union legal framework which limits strike action to unionised workers and to pay and conditions issues (Fourton, 2023). British trade-unions, although they have been very critical of the legal straitjacket imposed to industrial action, abide by it in order not to face legal action. What is industrial action like in such an adverse environment? Have trade-unions durably modernised after taking stock of the demise of strike action, or is the current strike wave merely a response to the current economic conjuncture? To what extent do these strikes result from a transformation of the job market? Which limits of trade-union action do they testify to, in a liberalised, flexibilised and uberised economy in which waged labour has largely been replaced by outsourcing and zero-hour contracts (Beynon, 2019; Carter, 2020; Lucio, 2018)? Are they actually not that surprising, given the struggles which have continued to be waged in the UK for the past 20 years over jobs, pay and conditions (Jenkins, 2017; Moore & Taylor, 2020, Upchurch, 2020)?

Finally, British trade-union identity requires new examination when even the most militant of trade-union leaderships seem to have fully accepted that the age of victorious and confident trade-union action is no more. How has this identity been transformed by four decades of neoliberalism? What image of themselves do trade-unions cultivate in an adverse media environment? Does social movement unionism (Lenormand, 2018; Parker, 2008), as promoted by the CWU and the RMT in the form of the Enough is Enough coalition, point to a broader transformation of the trade-union movement and of its relations with other social movement organisations?

b. Evolution of trade-union discourse and repertoires and transformations of the trade-union movement

The recent strike wave cannot, however, be reduced to its obvious limits or to what it lacks compared to the great national strikes which, from the end of the 1960s until the mid-1980s, contributed to making the British trade-union movement a key political player, that could make or break Conservative and Labour governments alike (McIlroy & Campbell, 1999). What makes this wave distinctive is also the evolutions of trade-union discourse and repertoires it exhibits, along with deep changes in workplaces and trade union organisation. 

First of all, the 2022-23 strikes have been characterised by a number of strategies aiming at circumventing the legal and institutional framework which limits trade-union action to pay and conditions. Strike dates, for instance, have been chosen so as to politicise the disputes at stake – such was the case when rail workers struck during the Conservative party conference, thereby symbolically identifying the government as their real adversary, or when civil servants struck on Budget Day. Similarly, the 2022 TUC Congress adopted the principle of coordinated strike action by different unions as a way of reinforcing the economic impact and the political weight of strike action. Are such politicising tactics proof that trade-unions are able to adapt to and innovate within a constraining legal framework, or do they rather betray the weakness of a movement which has interiorised its own limits? Do they show that trade-unions are able and willing to weigh on the public debate, or, on the contrary, that they are incapable of directly obtaining concessions from employers? Is coordination really a form of strategic intensification of strike action, or is it rather a sign that trade-union leaderships won’t fully commit to a general strike despite the poverty wages and the attacks of the Conservative government?

Secondly, the recent strike wave shows both the British trade-union movement and the contemporary workplace in a complex light, at least for those segments of the job market in which strikes have indeed taken place. Strikes began in the Winter of 2021-22 in private companies, in particular in the manufacturing sector, which, before the long de-industrialisation process inaugurated in the 1970s, used to be a trade-union stronghold. The largest strike wave since the Glorious Summer of 1972 (Darlington & Lyddon, 2001) was therefore initiated by organisations whose members are mainly male, largely unionised and in relatively well-paid jobs, with employers making substantial profits. It then spread to docks and to formerly nationalised enterprises (postal services and railway), and finally reached public services. The latter had been, for the last decades, central in the trade-union movement, both in terms of its now largely feminised membership and in terms of disputes. How should these dynamics be analysed? Is it that manufacturing sectors have returned to collective action after years of lethargy, or that striking is simply easier for groups of workers in less precarious positions? Alternatively, are we granting disproportionate clout to small groups of well-organised workers who happen to correspond to the traditional image of the white male working-class militant, when in actuality there is now a majority of women in British trade-unions and unionisation levels are highest among Black workers? What have been the consequences of organising campaigns in highly precarious industries, such as cleaning, catering and the food industry (Simms et al, 2012)? Is the sexist and racist segmentation of labour, which is nourished and reproduced by xenophobic discourse which trade-unions sometimes struggle to counter (Alberti et al, 2013; Holgate, 2005; Ince et al, 2015), at play in this strike wave, or does striking rather contribute to blurring or reducing these divisions? 

4. Understanding protest: concepts, spaces, time frames

Finally, the study of protest calls for a range of methodological and epistemological considerations, which can either be objects of inquiry in their own right or feed into approaches that are primarily ethnographical, historical or sociological. 

a. Concepts

The concepts we use to think about social protest should be interrogated: does the concept of social movement adequately describe the various forms of protest which have distinct histories, diverse organisational forms and different degrees of institutionalisation, and can it be applied equally in all instances? Taking the lead offered by French political sociology (Béroud et al, 1998), could the term social movement, singular, be used to refer to the whole field of organisations and movements collectively? What is to be made of the concept of mobilisation and its use in the field of industrial relations (Kelly, 1998)? Should one think in more localised terms, in terms of episodes of contention, and if so what should be made of the more long-term perspectives and of the evolution of aspiring or actual movements? Is it more effective to characterise social protest in terms of its practices, in what might be termed a pragmatic approach (Mathieu, 2002), or in a more institutional approach, in terms of its structures, discourses and actors (Mc Adam et al, 2001)?

b. Spaces

The delineation of the aforementioned space of social movements should also be interrogated: How permeable to one another are social movement politics and institutional politics? How do actors and ideas circulate between these spaces? What are their points of connection, and are they to be found primarily within organisations, whether trade unions or non-governmental organisations? What have been the processes of institutionalisation of social movements, as exemplified by the formation of the Green Party (1990) and of the National Health Action Party (2012), and conversely the processes of deinstitutionalisation, as has been the case for trade-unions, whose participation in political decision-making and access to government have been reduced? What are the expectations, one-way or mutual, and linkages between social movement organisations and party organisations?

c. Time frames

Finally, the temporal dimension of collective action and the ways in which this temporality is perceived and explored should also be discussed: what place should be given to events and their determinants (Gobille, 2008)? How can historical variations in the density and intensity of social protest be accounted for? What relevance for the notion of wave, used rather loosely for both trade-union struggles and feminist movements, and of that of ‘mobilisation cycle’ (Tarrow, 1993)? How do protest movements understand their own historicity? 

Ultimately, the time frame selected here, 1984-2024, should encourage and support an exploration of the recent history of and of the present period in the UK, which also means that its limitations should be acknowledged: what dynamics does the 1984-2024 time frame serve to better highlight, and which ones does it risk obscuring? What additional time frames, whether alternative or additional, should be used in order to compensate for such limitations and complement its insights?

Bibliography

ALBERTI Gabriella, HOLGATE Jane & TAPIA Maite, « Organising migrants as workers or as migrant workers? Intersectionality, trade unions and precarious work », The International Journal of Human Resource Management, vol. 24, n° 22, 2013, p. 4132-4148.

BAIN Peter, « The 1986-7 News International Dispute: Was the Workers’ Defeat Inevitable? », Historical Studies in Industrial Relations, n° 5, 1998, p. 73-105.

BAILEY David J., « Contending the crisis: What role for extra-parliamentary British politics? », British Politics, Vol. 9, No. 1, 2014, p. 68-92.

BAILEY David. J., LEWIS Paul. C. & SHIBATA Saori, « Contesting neoliberalism: Mapping the terrain of social conflict », Capital & Class, Vol. 46, No. 3, 2022, p. 449–478. 

BERTRAND Mathilde, CROWLEY Cornelius & LABICA Thierry, Ici notre défaite a commencé. La grève des mineurs britanniques (1984-1985), Paris: Syllepse, 2016.

BEROUD Sophie, MOURIAUX René & VAKALOULIS Michel, Le Mouvement social en France. Essai de sociologie politique, Paris: La Dispute, 1998.

BEYNON Huw, « After the Long Boom: Living with Capitalism in the Twenty-First Century », Historical Studies in Industrial Relations, vol. 40, 2019, https://doi.org/10.3828/hsir.2019.40.7

BEYNON Huw ed., Digging Deeper: Issues in the Miners Strike, London: Verso, 1985.

BROWN Gareth, DOWLING Emma, HARVIE David, MILBURN Keir, 2013, « Careless Talk: Social Reproduction and Fault Lines of the Crisis in the United Kingdom », Social Justice, Vol. 39, No. 1, p. 78-98.

CABADI Marie, Lesbiennes et gays au charbon. Solidarités avec les mineurs britanniques en grève, 1984-1985, Paris: EHESS, 2023.

CAMMAERTS Bart, The circulation of Antiausterity Protest, Palgrave Macmillan: London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018.

CARTER Bob, « After the Long Boom: The Reconfiguration of Work and Labour in the Public Sector », Historical Studies in Industrial Relations, vol. 41, n° 1, 2020.

CHRISTOPH Gilles, LENORMAND Marc et REMANOFSKY Sabine, Antisyndicalisme. La Vindicte des puissants. Discours et dispositifs anti-syndicaux, Vulaines-sur-Seine, Le Croquant, 2019.

DANIELS Gary & MCILROY John (ed), Trade Unions in a Neoliberal World: British Trade Unions under New Labour, London: Routledge, 2009.

DARLINGTON Ralph & LYDDON Dave, Glorious Summer: Class Struggle in Britain, 1972, London: Bookmarks, 2001.

DELLA PORTA Donatella & MATTONI Alice, « Patterns of Diffusion and the Transnational Dimension of Protest in the Movements of the Crisis: An Introduction », Spreading Protest, Colchester: ECPR Press, 2014, p. 1-18.

DOREY Peter, The Conservative Party and the Trade Unions, London: Routledge, 1996.

DIXON Keith, Un digne héritier : Blair et le Thatchérisme, Paris: Raisons d’Agir, 2000.

FOURTON Clémence, « Cartographie de l’espace citoyen anti-austérité au Royaume-Uni depuis la crise de 2008 », Observatoire de la société britannique, Vol. 23, 2018, p. 83-104.

FOURTON Clémence, « Au Royaume-Uni, un mouvement social à portée politique », AOC, 6 janvier 2023, [URL: https://aoc.media/analyse/2023/01/05/au-royaume-uni-un-mouvement-social-a-portee-politique/]

GOBILLE Boris, « L’événement Mai 68: Pour une sociohistoire du temps court », Annales. Histoire, Sciences Sociales, Vol. 63, N° 2, 2008, p. 319-349.

HAY Colin, « Narrating Crisis: The Discursive Construction of the Winter of Discontent », Sociology, Vol. 30, N°2, 1996, p. 253-277.

HOLGATE Jane, « Organizing migrant workers », Work, Employment and Society, vol. 19, n° 3, 2005, p. 463-480.

HOLMES Martin, Thatcherism: Scope and Limits, 1983-1987, Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1989.

HOWELL Chris, Trade Unions and the State: The Construction of Industrial Relations Institutions in Britain, 1890-2000, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2005.

INCE Anthony et al, « British jobs for British workers? Negotiating work, nation, and globalisation through the Lindsey Oil Refinery disputes », Antipode, vol. 47, n° 1, 2015, p. 139-157.

JENKINS Jean, « Hands not wanted: closure, and the moral economy of protest, Treorchy, South Wales », Historical Studies in Industrial Relations, vol. 38, n° 1, 2017, p. 1-36.

KELLY John, Rethinking Industrial Relations: Mobilization, collectivism and long waves, London: Routledge, 1998.

LABICA Thierry, « Margaret Thatcher ou l’embarras posthume. Funérailles, néolibéralisme et les spectres du travail », Observatoire de la société britannique, n° 17, 2015. [URL : http://journals.openedition.org/osb/1788]

LABICA Thierry, L’hypothèse Jeremy Corbyn : une histoire politique et sociale de la Grande-Bretagne depuis Tony Blair, Paris, Demopolis, 2019.

LENORMAND Marc, « Un syndicalisme de mouvement social? Les syndicats britanniques et les mobilisations contre l’austérité depuis la crise de 2008 », Observatoire de la société britannique, n°23, 2018, p. 169-185.

LENORMAND Marc, « Le Royaume en grève : Le renouveau du syndicalisme en Grande-Bretagne », La Vie des Idées, rubrique « Essais », 11 octobre 2022. [URL: https://laviedesidees.fr/Le-Royaume-en-greve.html]

LEWIS Paul, NEWBURN Tim, TAYLOR Matthew, MCGILLIVRAY Catriona, GREENHILL Aster, FRAYMAN Harold, PROCTOR Rob, « Reading the riots: investigating England’s summer of disorder », London: The London School of Economics and Political Science & The Guardian, 2011. 

LUCIO Miguel Martínez, « Trade union renewal and responses to neo-liberalism and the politics of austerity in the United Kingdom: the curious incubation of the political in labour relations », Workers of the World: International Journal on Strikes and Social Conflict, vol. 1, n° 9, 2018, p. 93-111.

MATHIEU Lilian, « Rapport au politique, dimensions cognitives et perspectives pragmatiques dans l’analyse des mouvements sociaux », Revue française de science politique, Vol. 52, No. 1, 2002, p. 75-100. 

MATHIEU Lilian, « L’espace des mouvements sociaux », Politix, vol. 77, no. 1, 2007, p. 131-151.

MCADAM Doug, TARROW Sidney, TILLY Charles, Dynamics of Contention, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001.

MCILROY John & CAMPBELL Alan, « The High Tide of Trade Unionism: Mapping Industrial Politics, 1964-1979 », John McIlroy et al. (ed), The High Tide of British Trade Unionism: trade unions and industrial politics, 1964-1979, Monmouth: Merlin, 1999, p. 93-130.

MOORE Sian & TAYLOR Phil, « Class reimagined? Intersectionality and industrial action: the British Airways dispute of 2009-2011 », Sociology, vol. 55, n° 3, 2020, p. 582-599.

MULLEN John, « La législation syndicale de Thatcher à Brown: menaces et opportunités pour les syndicats », Revue française de civilisation britannique, vol. 15, n° 2, 2009, p. 73-85.

NORA Pierre, « Between Memory and History: Les Lieux de Mémoire », Representations, Vol. 26, 1989, p. 7–24.

PARKER Jane, « The Trades Union Congress and civil alliance building: towards social alliance unionism? », Employee Relations, vol. 30, n° 5, 2008, p. 562-583.

RIBERA-ALMANDOZ Olatz, HUKE Nikolai, CLUA-LOSADA Mònica & BAILEY David J. (2020) « Anti-austerity between militant materialism and real democracy: exploring pragmatic prefigurativism », Globalizations, Vol. 17, No. 5, 2020, p. 766-781.

SCOTT Peter & WILLIAMS Steve, « The Coalition Government and Employment Relations: Accelerated Neo-Liberalism and the Rise of Employer-Dominated Voluntarism », Observatoire de La Société Britannique, vol. 15, 2014, p. 145–164. 

SIMMS Melanie, HOLGATE Jane & HEERY Edmund, Union Voices: Tactics and Tensions in UK Organizing, Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2012.

SMITH Paul, « The Conservative Governments’ Reform of Employment Law, 1979-97: ‘Stepping Stones’ and the ‘New Right’ Agenda », Historical Studies in Industrial Relations, n° 12, 2001, p. 131-147

STEAD Jean, Never the Same Again: women and the miner’s strike 1984-85, London: Women’s Press, 1987.

TARROW Sidney, « Cycles of Collective Action: Between Moments of Madness and the Repertoire of Contention », Social Science History, vol. 17, n° 2, 1993, p. 281–307.

TAYLOR Robert, The Trade Union Question in British Politics: Government and Unions Since 1945, Oxford: Blackwells, 1993.

UPCHURCH Martin, « Time, Tea Breaks, and the Frontier of Control in UK Workplaces », Historical Studies in Industrial Relations, vol. 41, n° 1, 2020.

ŽIŽEK Slavoj, « Shoplifters of the World Unite », London Review of Books, 19 août 2011, [URL: https://www.lrb.co.uk/2011/08/19/slavoj-zizek/shoplifters-of-the-world-unite].

AAC “1984-2024 : la contestation sociale au Royaume-Uni depuis la Grande grève des mineurs”

Appel à contribution

Cet appel est un double appel à contribution : 

  • Pour la journée d’étude “1984-2024 : la contestation sociale au Royaume-Uni depuis la Grande grève des mineurs” organisée à Sciences Po Lille le 6 mars 2024
  • Pour un numéro de la Revue Française de Civilisation Britannique en préparation sur le même thème

Les modalités de soumission et l’articulation entre la JE et le numéro de la RFCB sont détaillées plus bas.

Cette journée d’étude et ce numéro de la Revue Française de Civilisation Britannique se penchent sur la contestation sociale au Royaume-Uni au cours des quatre dernières décennies. L’année 2024 sera en effet marquée par le quarantième anniversaire du début de la Grande grève des mineurs (Great Miners’ Strike) de 1984-1985, et constitue donc un moment privilégié pour étudier la façon dont la contestation sociale s’est déployée au Royaume-Uni depuis 1984. 

Ce quarantième anniversaire peut être l’occasion de diverses opérations réflexives. Il peut s’agir d’approcher la période 1984-2024 dans son ensemble, en retraçant les dynamiques de contestation sociale au Royaume-Uni depuis la Grande grève des mineurs. Il peut s’agir de marquer, par la comparaison 1984/2024, les transformations qu’a connues le Royaume-Uni entre le milieu des années 1980 et ce début des années 2020, alors qu’une vague de grèves traverse le Royaume-Uni depuis l’hiver 2021-2022. L’année 2024, année anniversaire, appelle enfin une réflexion sur les commémorations d’une Grande grève des mineurs qui est devenue l’un des principaux lieux de mémoire (Nora, 1989) du mouvement syndical britannique, mais tient lieu aussi de point de référence pour d’autres mouvements de contestation. 

Cet anniversaire est donc à la fois le moteur d’une série d’interrogations sur l’histoire récente des luttes au Royaume-Uni et un dispositif heuristique pour les observateurs et observatrices du Royaume-Uni contemporain : il s’agit de porter un regard rétrospectif, panoramique sur les différentes formes de contestation sociale depuis ce moment charnière mais aussi d’éclairer la conjoncture actuelle à l’aune des effets de retour et de parallèle de celle-ci avec 1984.

Dans l’argumentaire détaillé plus bas, nous soumettons aux contributeurs et contributrices une série de pistes de réflexion qui se veulent ouvrir la discussion mais n’ont pas vocation à la fermer ou à délimiter un périmètre restrictif des questions qu’il est possible de formuler et des objets qu’il est possible de se donner pour examiner ces quarante années de contestation sociale. Si nous proposons une série d’hypothèses de travail, nous serons également heureuse et heureux de recevoir des contributions approchant ce champ d’interrogation à partir de perspectives qui auraient été oubliées dans cet appel à contributions.

De manière indicative, les contributions pourront porter sur les grandes questions suivantes : 

  • la période dans son ensemble
  • des épisodes contestataires particuliers
  • des mouvements sociaux : syndicalisme, luttes écologiques, féministes etc
  • des organisations et/ou des acteurs/actrices spécifiques
  • des formes de l’action collective
  • des formes, moments ou lieux d’articulation/convergence entre des luttes/mouvements
  • l’historicité des luttes et mouvements

Modalités de soumission

Nous invitons des contributions en deux étapes : 

  • Des propositions de communication (500 mots maximum) pour le 31 octobre 2023 : celles-ci, soumises au Comité scientifique de la journée d’études “1984-2024 : la contestation sociale au Royaume-Uni depuis la Grande grève des mineurs”, permettront de déterminer le programme de cette JE qui sera l’occasion de mettre en discussion des projets d’article ou des articles déjà complets
  • Des articles complets pour le 31 mai 2024, qui seront soumis au Comité scientifique du numéro de la Revue française de civilisation britannique 

La participation à la JE du 6 mars n’est ni une condition pour l’envoi d’un article pour le numéro de la RFCB, ni une garantie de publication dans le numéro.

Les intentions d’écriture ainsi que les articles complets sont à adresser à Clémence Fourton (Sciences Po Lille, CECILLE : clemence.fourton@sciencespo-lille.eu) et à Marc Lenormand (Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3, EMMA : Marc.Lenormand@univ-montp3.fr) 

Comité scientifique

  • Emmanuelle Avril, Université Sorbonne Nouvelle, CREW
  • David Bailey, University of Birmingham
  • Emma Bell, Université Savoie Mont-Blanc, LLSETI
  • Oscar Berglund, University of Bristol
  • Mathilde Bertrand, Université Bordeaux Montaigne, CLIMAS
  • Bernd Bonfert, Aarhus Universitet
  • Charles Devellennes, Kent University
  • Thierry Labica, Université Paris Nanterre, CREA
  • Marie-Violaine Louvet, Université Toulouse Jean-Jaurès, CAS
  • Claire Mansour, Université Toulouse Jean-Jaurès, CAS
  • Jacob Mukherjee, Goldsmiths’ College
  • John Mullen, Université de Rouen, ERIAC

Argumentaire 

1. Grande grève des mineurs, consensus anti-syndical et neutralisation de l’action collective 

La Grande grève des mineurs de 1984-1985 a été le moment clé du déploiement de l’arsenal anti-syndical patiemment élaboré par les Conservateurs depuis les défaites du gouvernement Heath face aux grèves nationales des mineurs de 1972 et 1974 et mis en place par le gouvernement Thatcher à partir de son arrivée au pouvoir en 1979 (Dorey, 1995 ; Smith, 2001). Lois anti-syndicales, réorganisation de la police, direction anti-syndicale à la tête du National Coal Board : tout a été mis en place pour briser le syndicat perçu à juste titre comme le plus militant et le plus susceptible de faire échouer l’imposition d’une restructuration néolibérale de l’économie britannique (Beynon, 1985). A la suite de la large victoire électorale des Conservateurs en 1983 et de la défaite des mineurs en 1984-1985, le second mandat de Margaret Thatcher est le moment de radicalisation du programme néo-libéral (Holmes, 1989). 

a. Retour sur la Grande grève des mineurs

Avec la grève générale de 1926, la Grande grève des mineurs est, de tous les conflits sociaux de l’histoire britannique, celui qui a occasionné la plus grande production (écrite, orale, visuelle), à la fois du côté de la recherche universitaire que du côté des histoires militantes et des productions fictionnelles (Bertrand et al, 2016). Cette large production, entamée dès la grève et étoffée lors de chacun de ses anniversaires décennaux, constitue désormais un objet d’étude en soi : comment les regards militants ou universitaires sur la Grande grève des mineurs ont-ils évolué depuis 1984 ? 

La large production écrite sur la Grande grève des mineurs ne l’a toutefois pas épuisée comme objet de recherche, a fortiori car les archives gouvernementales sur la période se sont ouvertes il y a dix ans et que des champs de recherche comme l’histoire ouvrière (labour history) et l’étude des relations professionnelles (industrial relations) se sont renouvelés au cours des deux dernières décennies. Ces champs se nourrissent en particulier des études de genre et des études critiques sur la race : ce numéro, loin de prendre la Grande grève des mineurs comme seul prétexte, appelle au contraire à des contributions originales sur l’épisode fondateur de 1984-1985. 

b. Comprendre la neutralisation de l’action collective et la constitution d’un consensus anti-syndical 

La Grande grève des mineurs de 1984-1985 s’inscrit ensuite dans une trajectoire de constitution d’un consensus anti-syndical, au sens d’une délégitimation de l’action collective des travailleurs et des travailleuses, et de neutralisation de cette action collective par un ensemble de dispositifs étatiques, juridiques, financiers et managériaux (Christoph et al, 2019 ; Howell, 2005). C’est une dynamique ébauchée dès la décennie précédente, avec des premières tentatives de restreindre l’action syndicale sous la forme du projet In Place of Strife (1969) du gouvernement travailliste de Harold Wilson et de la loi Industrial Relations Act (1971) votée par les Conservateurs. Ces deux initiatives ont suscité une puissante réaction des bases syndicales, ainsi que la mobilisation victorieuse d’une rhétorique anti-syndicale par la direction thatchérienne du Parti conservateur et ses relais médiatiques dans la seconde moitié des années 1970 (Hay, 1996). C’est une dynamique qui se déploie pleinement toutefois dans les années 1980, lorsque les Conservateurs au pouvoir font voter une série de lois limitant l’action syndicale et soutiennent le patronat dans une entreprise de marginalisation systématique des organisations syndicales (Taylor, 1993) : à la Grande grève des mineurs de 1984-1985 succède ainsi le conflit de Wapping (1986) qui vient à bout du syndicat de l’imprimerie (Bain, 1998). Surtout, les victoires conservatrices contre les syndicats du milieu des années 1980 ont semblé marquer l’entrée dans l’ère d’un consensus anti-syndical dont les gouvernements travaillistes (1997-2010) n’ont pas pu ou pas voulu s’émanciper (Daniels & McIlroy, 2009 ; Dixon, 2000 ; Mullen, 2009), si bien que l’arsenal anti-syndical mis en place par les gouvernements thatchériens, loin de se réduire, a pu être encore durci par les Conservateurs revenus au pouvoir depuis 2010 (Scott & Williams 2014).

Cette trajectoire historique appelle une série de questions : quel rôle a joué la Grande grève des mineurs dans la constitution d’un consensus anti-syndical au Royaume-Uni ? Est-il adéquat de considérer le milieu des années 1980 comme un moment de bascule dans l’ère du consensus anti-syndical ? Comment comprendre la stabilisation du consensus anti-syndical par-delà ce moment d’affrontement décisif avec les secteurs les plus militants du mouvement syndical britannique et son renforcement dans les décennies suivantes ? Quels en ont été les acteurs, les facteurs, les motivations et les effets (Labica, 2015) ? 

A l’inverse y a-t-il une erreur ou un risque, dans notre compréhension des quatre dernières décennies, à absolutiser ce consensus anti-syndical et le processus de neutralisation de l’action collective ? Quelle attention prêter à la pluralité des discours dominants (gouvernementaux, patronaux, médiatiques), aux contre-discours et aux contre-mémoires, à l’instar du caractère unificateur, dans la gauche britannique et dans certaines communautés ouvrières, de la détestation de M. Thatcher et des politiques qu’elle a menées? 

2. 1984-2024 : transformations du champ de la contestation sociale

La Grande grève des mineurs de 1984-1985 se trouve à la conjonction de deux dynamiques. D’un côté, brisant la résistance du syndicat des mineurs, elle constitue une étape importante dans la dynamique de reflux numérique des organisations syndicales depuis leur apogée à la fin des années 1970 et de leur marginalisation dans les champs économiques, politiques et culturels. De l’autre, elle survient alors que se déploient et se renforcent au Royaume-Uni, depuis le début des années 1970, une série de mouvements de contestation de l’ordre social et politique, en particulier les mouvements de libération des femmes et des gays et lesbiennes, dont la participation et le soutien à la grève des mineurs est désormais bien documenté (Cabadi, 2023 ; Stead, 1987). 

Le paradoxe de la Grande grève des mineurs est donc que, lutte syndicale par excellence, elle souligne aussi dans les formes qu’elle a prises que la contestation sociale ne se limite pas à l’action syndicale. L’examen de la période 1984-2024 appelle donc à réfléchir à l’évolution relative du mouvement syndical britannique et des autres mouvements de contestation, qu’il s’agisse de logiques de déplacement, substitution, convergence ou divergence.  

a. Marginalisation syndicale et déplacement de la contestation sociale ?

En perdant sa capacité à imposer un rapport de force victorieux aux gouvernements et au patronat, le mouvement syndical britannique, dans lequel les travailleurs et travailleuses pouvaient fonder leurs espoirs d’amélioration des conditions d’existence et les militant-e-s leurs aspirations à une transformation profonde de l’ordre social et politique, a aussi perdu de sa centralité.

On peut donc s’interroger : l’émergence d’un consensus anti-syndical et la neutralisation des formes syndicales de l’action collective ont-elles produit des transformations de la contestation sociale et des déplacements de celle-ci entre le champ de l’action syndicale et d’autres espaces de mobilisation collective, et si oui lesquels ? 

Faut-il voir les phénomènes émeutiers qui caractérisent au Royaume-Uni (et au-delà) la période ouverte depuis les années 1980 comme le produit et l’illustration d’un tel déplacement, sachant que leur attribuer une signification est un exercice périlleux et potentiellement réducteur (Žižek, 2011) ? Ou faut-il distinguer entre les épisodes émeutiers associés à des revendications explicites, comme la Poll Tax Riot (1990), le hooliganisme davantage ancré dans le monde ouvrier blanc, et les émeutes du nord de l’Angleterre de l’été 2001 ou celles des grandes villes anglaises de l’été 2011, lesquelles sont motivées par “un sentiment généralisé d’injustice” de populations marginalisées, portant tout à la fois sur la pauvreté, les violences policières et leur dimension raciste, et les politiques gouvernementales (Lewis et al, 2011) ? 

Qu’en est-il du développement à partir de 2010 d’un mouvement citoyen contre les politiques d’austérité, dans un contexte plus large de « mouvements de la crise » (Della Porta & Mattoni, 2014) suite à la crise financière de 2008 et aux politiques de rigueur budgétaire qui l’ont suivie dans de nombreux pays (Bailey et al, 2022) ? Au Royaume-Uni, celui-ci prend la forme d’une nébuleuse où coexistent collectifs ad hoc et organisations préexistantes (Fourton, 2018) et marque une intensification significative de la conflictualité sociale assimilable à un cycle de mobilisation (Bailey 2018). Faut-il alors voir une forme de continuité et de convergence entre, d’une part, ce mouvement anti-austérité, sa composante étudiante, les occupations d’Occupy et, d’autre part, le mouvement syndical, en ce qu’ils répondent, tout comme à leur façon les émeutes, à une « crise du soin » (Brown et al, 2013 : 79) ? Faut-il à l’inverse y voir une logique de substitution dans une population désormais faiblement syndiquée et chez des militant-es qui constatent l’urgence à agir contre la destruction des droits sociaux ? Sommes-nous passé-e-s de mobilisations syndicales à l’horizon majoritaire, serait-ce au niveau de l’atelier ou de l’entreprise, à des formes d’action collective extra-institutionnelles, menées par des collectifs minoritaires, qui épousent des logiques préfiguratives (Ribera-Almandoz et al, 2020) ? Cammaerts (2018), en considérant que les luttes contre l’austérité sont le mouvement qui a le plus clairement déployé une contre-hégémonie au consensus néolibéral depuis la crise financière de 2008, suggère ainsi que l’action syndicale ne constitue plus le lieu privilégié de la mise en question de l’ordre économique et social, que la contestation du néolibéralisme se joue désormais ailleurs. 

Enfin, cette analyse d’un déplacement des acteurs, lieux et formes de la contestation sociale est-il l’annonce d’une reconfiguration profonde de la lutte contre un contexte néo-libéral répressif, un simple correctif à l’attention dont a bénéficié le mouvement syndical, ou à l’inverse une perception déformée produite par une focalisation et la visibilisation d’actions qui visent spécifiquement des formes de médiatisation ? 

b. L’espace des mouvements sociaux et ses reconfigurations sur la période 1984-2024

Reprenant le concept forgé par Lilian Mathieu (2007), on peut penser les mouvements sociaux comme se déployant, se positionnant et s’articulant au sein d’un “espace des mouvements sociaux” qui se configure spécifiquement en fonction des mouvements sociaux qui ont émergé ou continuent d’agir au Royaume-Uni pendant la période 1984-2024, dont on peut ébaucher une liste nécessairement non-exhaustive et plurielle : mouvements pacifistes de désarmement nucléaire, mouvements écologistes, mouvements féministes, mouvements antiracistes, mouvements LGBT+, mouvements des personnes en situation de handicap, mouvements anti-austérité, mouvements pro- et anti-européen, mouvements nationalistes et indépendantistes. 

Toute observation des mouvements de contestation au Royaume-Uni pendant la période 1984-2024 appelle d’ailleurs à prendre en compte les spécificités territoriales d’un espace pluri-national, traversé également par des lignes de fracture multiples. Elle appelle aussi une prise en compte des grandes questions constitutionnelles et identitaires qui polarisent le débat public et affectent les vies quotidiennes, parfois de manière dramatique : la période 1984-2024 est en effet marquée par le conflit nord-irlandais et la fin de sa phase militaire grâce au processus de paix, par la dévolution qui redistribue le pouvoir et les équilibres institutionnels entre le centre anglais et les nations minoritaires, enfin par les questions écossaises et européennes qui reconfigurent les identités politiques à partir des années 2010. Tous ces processus, pour institutionnels et constitutionnels qu’ils soient, débordent, voire débutent dans l’espace des mouvements sociaux, renvoyant donc à la question des modalités d’apparition et de déploiement des mouvements sociaux depuis 1984 au Royaume-Uni. Comment l’espace des mouvements sociaux a-t-il dès lors été reconfiguré par l’émergence de nouvelles questions constitutionnelles et identitaires ainsi que par les transformations institutionnelles qui en ont souvent résulté ?

Établir des panoramas, cartographies et chronologies de la contestation sociale ou de certains mouvements de contestation au cours des 40 années qui nous occupent sera l’un des enjeux de ce numéro. Au-delà de l’identification et du recensement de ces mouvements et de leurs trajectoires relativement individuelles, il y a un enjeu à penser leurs chronologies parallèles ainsi que leurs croisements : y a-t-il eu des points de rencontres matériels ou politiques entre ces différents mouvements ? Quels en ont été les moments et les lieux privilégiés ? Faut-il voir le Parti travailliste dirigé par Jeremy Corbyn (2015-2020) comme un tel espace de rencontre (Labica, 2019) ? Ces convergences se sont-elles faites autour de dénominateurs communs a minima, à l’instar de l’anti-thatcherisme, ou bien autour d’horizons communs au contenu positif comme des revendications de justice sociale, économique ou écologique ? Matériellement aussi bien qu’idéologiquement, la contestation sociale est-elle structurée en réseaux, autour d’acteurs ou bien de composantes ? En bref, à quoi ressemble l’espace dynamique des mouvements sociaux au Royaume-Uni, et, le cas échéant, dans quels espaces contestataires trans- ou inter-nationaux gagne-t-il à être compris ?

3. La vague de grèves de 2022-23 : un retour de l’action syndicale ?

La mise en regard du milieu des années 1980 et de la période contemporaine fait apparaître des effets de retour – d’acteurs, de répertoires d’action, de discours – aussi bien que de décalage. Ainsi, à rebours de l’effacement de l’action syndicale noté plus haut, la vague de grèves qui traverse le Royaume-Uni depuis l’hiver 2021-2022 peut apparaître comme un retour des luttes syndicales qui avaient connu non seulement une baisse après le milieu des années 1980 mais même une trajectoire continuellement descendante, au point d’atteindre au milieu des années 2010 un plancher historique (Lenormand, 2022). Avec la multiplication des grèves, « la classe ouvrière est de retour » comme Mick Lynch, le secrétaire général de la RMT, l’a affirmé avec force. 

D’un autre côté, les formes que prend l’action syndicale dans la vague de grève en cours mettent en évidence de manière tout aussi éclatante la nouvelle configuration sociale, politique et économique du Royaume-Uni du début des années 2020 : il n’y aura pas de retour à 1984. Si la vague de grèves qui traverse les entreprises du secteur privé et les services publics depuis l’hiver 2021-2022 est inédite par son ampleur et sa durée depuis les années 1970, elle est surtout l’épisode gréviste le plus large et le plus significatif depuis l’imposition et la stabilisation du consensus anti-syndical au cours des années 1980 et 1990. Elle appelle donc à questionner les formes de l’action syndicale en contexte anti-syndical et à comprendre les transformations organisationnelles et idéologiques du mouvement syndical au cours des quatre dernières décennies. 

a. Une action syndicale en contexte hostile

La vague de grèves qui s’est soulevée au Royaume-Uni depuis l’hiver 2021-2022 a enthousiasmé les militant-e-s, remis la question sociale au cœur du débat public et suscité une production journalistique et universitaire nourrie. Toutefois, il est important de pointer d’emblée les limites de ces grèves. Tout d’abord, il s’agit en fait d’un ensemble de conflits locaux ou sectoriels, nécessairement situés et cantonnés au niveau de l’entreprise ou du secteur d’activité en raison d’un cadre juridique anti-syndical qui limite l’action gréviste aux seul-es travailleurs et travailleuses syndiqué-es et aux seules questions professionnelles (Fourton, 2023). Les syndicats britanniques, même s’ils critiquent le carcan juridique dont l’action syndicale fait l’objet, s’y conforment de manière à se prémunir des poursuites judiciaires qu’ils encourent sinon. A quoi ressemble une action syndicale en contexte hostile ? Y a-t-il eu un aggiornamento syndical tirant les leçons des dernières décennies de reflux de l’action gréviste ou s’agit-il d’un simple effet conjoncturel ? Dans quelle mesure ces grèves sont-elles le résultat d’une transformation du rapport de force avec les employeurs en raison des transformations récentes du marché du travail, et de quelles limites de l’action syndicale témoignent-elles dans une économie largement libéralisée, flexibilisée et uberisée où le salariat a largement reculé au profit de la sous-traitance et du paiement à la tâche (Beynon, 2019 ; Carter, 2020 ; Lucio, 2018) ? Sont-elles en vérité moins étonnantes qu’il n’y paraît, lorsqu’on prête attention aux luttes menées au Royaume-Uni au cours des deux dernières décennies pour les emplois, les salaires et les conditions de travail (Jenkins, 2017 ; Moore & Taylor, 2020, Upchurch, 2020) ? 

Enfin, que l’impossible retour au syndicalisme triomphant et sûr de sa force semble avoir été pleinement intégré par les directions des organisations syndicales même les plus militantes, amène à s’interroger sur l’identité syndicale britannique. A-t-elle été reconfigurée par quatre décennies de transformation néo-libérale de l’économie ? Quelle image les organisations syndicales s’emploient-elles à produire d’elles-mêmes dans un contexte médiatique hostile ? Que dit le syndicalisme de mouvement social (Lenormand, 2018 ; Parker, 2008) promu par le syndicat des postier-es et celui des cheminot-es, à l’instar de la coalition Enough is Enough, de l’état du mouvement syndical et des autres forces du mouvement social ?

b. Évolutions des discours et répertoires syndicaux et transformation du mouvement syndical

La vague de grèves récente ne peut toutefois pas être examinée uniquement sous l’angle de ses limites évidentes ou des reculs qu’elle marque par rapport aux grandes grèves nationales qui, de la fin des années 1960 au milieu des années 1980, semblaient faire du mouvement syndical britannique un acteur politique majeur, faisant ou défaisant les gouvernements conservateurs comme travaillistes (McIlroy & Campbell, 1999). S’y manifestent également des évolutions des discours et des répertoires syndicaux ainsi que les évolutions profondes du monde du travail et du mouvement syndical. 

En premier lieu, les grèves de 2022-23 sont caractérisées aussi par un ensemble de stratégies de contournement du cadre institutionnel et législatif qui limite l’action syndicale aux seules questions professionnelles. Le choix des dates de mobilisation permet par exemple de politiser la grève, comme lorsque les cheminots font grève pendant la conférence annuelle du Parti conservateur, désignant ainsi symboliquement le gouvernement comme son adversaire réel, ou encore le jour de la présentation de la loi de finance. De la même manière, l’organisation de journées de grève coordonnées entre différents syndicats, dont le principe a été adopté lors du congrès du TUC à l’automne 2022, permet de renforcer la portée économique et le poids politique des actions de grève. Faut-il voir dans la politisation des actions de grève la démonstration des qualités d’adaptation des organisations syndicales au cadre juridique contraint qui leur est imposé ou bien les faiblesses d’un mouvement syndical qui a intériorisé ses propres limites ? Faut-il y voir leur capacité et leur détermination à peser sur le débat public ou bien leur impuissance à engager le rapport de force avec les directions patronales ? La coordination des grèves reflète-t-elle une stratégisation de la conflictualité par les directions syndicales ou bien marque-t-elle au contraire leur refus d’assumer pleinement la nécessité de la grève générale contre l’appauvrissement des travailleurs et des travailleuses, et les attaques du gouvernement conservateur ?

En second lieu, la vague de grèves récente dresse un portrait complexe du mouvement syndical britannique et du monde du travail, ou du moins de ces parties du monde du travail dans lequel il est ancré. Les grèves ont commencé à l’hiver 2021-2022 dans les entreprises du secteur privé, en particulier du secteur manufacturier qui, avant la longue désindustrialisation entamée dès les années 1970, constituait l’un des principaux bastions syndicaux : ce sont donc en premier lieu les organisations syndiquant des travailleurs principalement masculins, fortement syndiqués et relativement bien rémunérés dans des entreprises réalisant des bénéfices considérables, qui ont relancé une vague de grève inédite depuis un demi-siècle (Darlington & Lyddon, 2001). Celle-ci s’est ensuite étendue aux docks et aux anciennes entreprises nationales de la poste et des chemins de fer avant d’arriver enfin dans les services publics qui, au cours des dernières décennies, sont devenus le centre de gravité numérique d’un mouvement syndical désormais largement féminisé et le principal foyer des grèves. Comment comprendre ces dynamiques ? La période récente marque-t-elle le grand retour dans l’action collective de secteurs ouvriers jusqu’alors atones ou confirme-t-elle simplement que la grève est un outil plus aisément mobilisable par les franges les moins précarisées du salariat ? S’agit-il d’une représentation déformée qui accorde un poids disproportionné à des petits groupes de travailleurs fortement organisés qui correspondent aussi à l’image traditionnelle d’un prolétariat blanc et masculin, alors que le syndicalisme britannique est désormais majoritairement féminin et les Antillais sont la communauté la plus fortement syndiquée ? Quels ont été les effets des campagnes de syndicalisation dans les secteurs précarisés du nettoyage, de la restauration ou de l’agro-alimentaire (Simms et al, 2012) ? La division raciste et sexiste du monde du travail, alimentée et reproduite par des discours xénophobes contre lesquels les organisations syndicales peinent parfois à lutter (Alberti et al, 2013 ; Holgate, 2005 ; Ince et al, 2015), s’est-elle manifestée dans cette vague de grève ou la lutte contribue-t-elle à l’inverse à dissimuler ou réduire ces fractures ? 

4. Contestations sociales : catégories, espaces, périodisations 

Pourfinir, la réflexion sur la contestation sociale appelle un ensemble de réflexion d’ordre méthodologique et épistémologique qui peuvent aussi bien constituer des objets en soi que nourrir des approches avant tout historiques, panoramiques ou sociologiques. 

a. Catégories

On peut interroger les catégories d’analyse que nous employons pour penser les contestations sociales : la catégorie de mouvement social permet-elle de décrire de manière adéquate des formes de contestation aux histoires distinctes et aux formes organisationnelles très diversement institutionnalisées ? Peut-on, sur le modèle de la sociologie politique française (Béroud et al, 1998), donner le nom de mouvement social à cet espace faiblement homogène mais partageant un ensemble de pratiques ? Que faire de la catégorie de mobilisation et de son application jusqu’au monde du travail (Kelly, 1998) ? Faut-il penser de manière plus localisée en termes d’épisode contestataire et alors que faire de l’inscription dans la durée et de l’évolution de ce qui aspire à faire mouvement ou le constitue dans les faits ? Est-il plus efficace de caractériser la contestation sociale par ses pratiques, dans une approche qu’on pourra qualifier de pragmatique (Mathieu, 2002), ou bien dans une approche plus institutionnelle, par ses structures, ses discours et ses acteurs (Mc Adam et al, 2001) ?

b. Espaces

On peut interroger les contours et limites de l’espace des mouvements sociaux précédemment évoqué : Quelle perméabilité entre la politique des mouvements sociaux et la politique institutionnelle ? Quelles circulations des acteurs et des idées entre ces espaces ? Quels sont les points de connexion et sont-ils à chercher du côté des organisations, qu’il s’agisse des syndicats ou des organisations non-gouvernementales ? Quels ont été les processus d’institutionnalisation des mouvements sociaux, à l’instar du Green Party (1990) ou encore du National Health Action Party (2012) et à l’inverse de désinstitutionnalisation comme cela a été le cas pour les syndicats dont la participation à la décision politique et les accès aux lieux du pouvoir se sont réduits ? Quelles attentes et quels effets de relais entre les organisations du mouvement social et des organisations partisanes ? 

c. Périodisations

On peut interroger aussi les temporalités de l’action collective et leurs modalités d’appréhension : quelle place accorder à l’événement et à ses déterminations (Gobille, 2008) ? Comment rendre compte des variations d’intensité de la conflictualité sociale ? Quelle pertinence de la notion de vague, employée de manière lâche tant pour les luttes syndicales que pour les mouvements féministes, ou encore de celle de “cycle de mobilisation” (Tarrow, 1993) ? Quelle appréhension par les mouvements de contestation de leur propre historicité ? 

Enfin, la périodisation proposée ici, 1984-2024, se veut un appui à la réflexion pour interroger la période contemporaine et le moment présent au Royaume-Uni mais doit être soumise à la critique : Quelles dynamiques permet-elle de mettre en évidence et à l’inverse lesquelles risque-t-elle de minorer ? Quels cadrages ou périodisations complémentaires est-il utile de mobiliser pour modérer ces risques ? 

Bibliographie

ALBERTI Gabriella, HOLGATE Jane & TAPIA Maite, « Organising migrants as workers or as migrant workers ? Intersectionality, trade unions and precarious work », The International Journal of Human Resource Management, vol. 24, n° 22, 2013, p. 4132-4148.

BAIN Peter, « The 1986-7 News International Dispute : Was the Workers’ Defeat Inevitable ? », Historical Studies in Industrial Relations, n° 5, 1998, p. 73-105.

BAILEY David J., « Contending the crisis : What role for extra-parliamentary British politics ? », British Politics, Vol. 9, No. 1, 2014, p. 68-92.

BAILEY David. J., LEWIS Paul. C. & SHIBATA Saori, « Contesting neoliberalism : Mapping the terrain of social conflict », Capital & Class, Vol. 46, No. 3, 2022, p. 449–478. 

BERTRAND Mathilde, CROWLEY Cornelius & LABICA Thierry, Ici notre défaite a commencé. La grève des mineurs britanniques (1984-1985), Paris : Syllepse, 2016.

BEROUD Sophie, MOURIAUX René & VAKALOULIS Michel, Le Mouvement social en France. Essai de sociologie politique, Paris: La Dispute, 1998.

BEYNON Huw, « After the Long Boom : Living with Capitalism in the Twenty-First Century », Historical Studies in Industrial Relations, vol. 40, 2019, https://doi.org/10.3828/hsir.2019.40.7

BEYNON Huw ed., Digging Deeper : Issues in the Miners Strike, London: Verso, 1985.

BROWN Gareth, DOWLING Emma, HARVIE David, MILBURN Keir, 2013, « Careless Talk : Social Reproduction and Fault Lines of the Crisis in the United Kingdom », Social Justice, Vol. 39, No. 1, p. 78-98.

CABADI Marie, Lesbiennes et gays au charbon. Solidarités avec les mineurs britanniques en grève, 1984-1985, Paris: EHESS, 2023.

CAMMAERTS Bart, The circulation of Antiausterity Protest, Palgrave Macmillan : London : Palgrave Macmillan, 2018.

CARTER Bob, « After the Long Boom : The Reconfiguration of Work and Labour in the Public Sector », Historical Studies in Industrial Relations, vol. 41, n° 1, 2020.

CHRISTOPH Gilles, LENORMAND Marc et REMANOFSKY Sabine, Antisyndicalisme. La Vindicte des puissants. Discours et dispositifs anti-syndicaux, Vulaines-sur-Seine, Le Croquant, 2019.

DANIELS Gary & MCILROY John (ed), Trade Unions in a Neoliberal World : British Trade Unions under New Labour, London : Routledge, 2009.

DARLINGTON Ralph & LYDDON Dave, Glorious Summer: Class Struggle in Britain, 1972, London: Bookmarks, 2001.

DELLA PORTA Donatella & MATTONI Alice, « Patterns of Diffusion and the Transnational Dimension of Protest in the Movements of the Crisis : An Introduction », Spreading Protest, Colchester: ECPR Press, 2014, p. 1-18.

DOREY Peter, The Conservative Party and the Trade Unions, London: Routledge, 1996.

DIXON Keith, Un digne héritier : Blair et le Thatchérisme, Paris : Raisons d’Agir, 2000.

FOURTON Clémence, « Cartographie de l’espace citoyen anti-austérité au Royaume-Uni depuis la crise de 2008 », Observatoire de la société britannique, Vol. 23, 2018, p. 83-104.

FOURTON Clémence, « Au Royaume-Uni, un mouvement social à portée politique », AOC, 6 janvier 2023, [URL : https://aoc.media/analyse/2023/01/05/au-royaume-uni-un-mouvement-social-a-portee-politique/]

GOBILLE Boris, « L’événement Mai 68 : Pour une sociohistoire du temps court », Annales. Histoire, Sciences Sociales, Vol. 63, N° 2, 2008, p. 319-349.

HAY Colin, « Narrating Crisis : The Discursive Construction of the Winter of Discontent », Sociology, Vol. 30, N°2, 1996, p. 253-277.

HOLGATE Jane, « Organizing migrant workers », Work, Employment and Society, vol. 19, n° 3, 2005, p. 463-480.

HOLMES Martin, Thatcherism: Scope and Limits, 1983-1987, Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1989.

HOWELL Chris, Trade Unions and the State : The Construction of Industrial Relations Institutions in Britain, 1890-2000, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2005.

INCE Anthony et al, « British jobs for British workers ? Negotiating work, nation, and globalisation through the Lindsey Oil Refinery disputes », Antipode, vol. 47, n° 1, 2015, p. 139-157.

JENKINS Jean, « Hands not wanted : closure, and the moral economy of protest, Treorchy, South Wales », Historical Studies in Industrial Relations, vol. 38, n° 1, 2017, p. 1-36.

KELLY John, Rethinking Industrial Relations: Mobilization, collectivism and long waves, London: Routledge, 1998.

LABICA Thierry, « Margaret Thatcher ou l’embarras posthume. Funérailles, néolibéralisme et les spectres du travail », Observatoire de la société britannique, n° 17, 2015. [URL : http://journals.openedition.org/osb/1788]

LABICA Thierry, L’hypothèse Jeremy Corbyn : une histoire politique et sociale de la Grande-Bretagne depuis Tony Blair, Paris, Demopolis, 2019.

LENORMAND Marc, « Un syndicalisme de mouvement social ? Les syndicats britanniques et les mobilisations contre l’austérité depuis la crise de 2008 », Observatoire de la société britannique, n°23, 2018, p. 169-185.

LENORMAND Marc, « Le Royaume en grève : Le renouveau du syndicalisme en Grande-Bretagne », La Vie des Idées, rubrique « Essais », 11 octobre 2022. [URL : https://laviedesidees.fr/Le-Royaume-en-greve.html]

LEWIS Paul, NEWBURN Tim, TAYLOR Matthew, MCGILLIVRAY Catriona, GREENHILL Aster, FRAYMAN Harold, PROCTOR Rob, « Reading the riots : investigating England’s summer of disorder », London: The London School of Economics and Political Science & The Guardian, 2011. 

LUCIO Miguel Martínez, « Trade union renewal and responses to neo-liberalism and the politics of austerity in the United Kingdom : the curious incubation of the political in labour relations », Workers of the World : International Journal on Strikes and Social Conflict, vol. 1, n° 9, 2018, p. 93-111.

MATHIEU Lilian, « Rapport au politique, dimensions cognitives et perspectives pragmatiques dans l’analyse des mouvements sociaux », Revue française de science politique, Vol. 52, No. 1, 2002, p. 75-100. 

MATHIEU Lilian, « L’espace des mouvements sociaux », Politix, vol. 77, no. 1, 2007, p. 131-151.

MCADAM Doug, TARROW Sidney, TILLY Charles, Dynamics of Contention, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001.

MCILROY John & CAMPBELL Alan, « The High Tide of Trade Unionism : Mapping Industrial Politics, 1964-1979 », John McIlroy et al. (ed), The High Tide of British Trade Unionism: trade unions and industrial politics, 1964-1979, Monmouth: Merlin, 1999, p. 93-130.

MOORE Sian & TAYLOR Phil, « Class reimagined? Intersectionality and industrial action : the British Airways dispute of 2009-2011 », Sociology, vol. 55, n° 3, 2020, p. 582-599.

MULLEN John, « La législation syndicale de Thatcher à Brown : menaces et opportunités pour les syndicats », Revue française de civilisation britannique, vol. 15, n° 2, 2009, p. 73-85.

NORA Pierre, « Between Memory and History: Les Lieux de Mémoire », Representations, Vol. 26, 1989, p. 7–24.

PARKER Jane, « The Trades Union Congress and civil alliance building : towards social alliance unionism ? », Employee Relations, vol. 30, n° 5, 2008, p. 562-583.

RIBERA-ALMANDOZ Olatz, HUKE Nikolai, CLUA-LOSADA Mònica & BAILEY David J. (2020) « Anti-austerity between militant materialism and real democracy : exploring pragmatic prefigurativism », Globalizations, Vol. 17, No. 5, 2020, p. 766-781.

SCOTT Peter & WILLIAMS Steve, « The Coalition Government and Employment Relations : Accelerated Neo-Liberalism and the Rise of Employer-Dominated Voluntarism », Observatoire de La Société Britannique, vol. 15, 2014, p. 145–164. 

SIMMS Melanie, HOLGATE Jane & HEERY Edmund, Union Voices : Tactics and Tensions in UK Organizing, Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2012.

SMITH Paul, « The Conservative Governments’ Reform of Employment Law, 1979-97 : ‘Stepping Stones’ and the ‘New Right’ Agenda », Historical Studies in Industrial Relations, n° 12, 2001, p. 131-147

STEAD Jean, Never the same again : women and the miner’s strike 1984-85, London: Women’s Press, 1987.

TARROW Sidney, « Cycles of Collective Action : Between Moments of Madness and the Repertoire of Contention », Social Science History, vol. 17, n° 2, 1993, p. 281–307.

TAYLOR Robert, The Trade Union Question in British Politics : Government and Unions Since 1945, Oxford: Blackwells, 1993.

UPCHURCH Martin, « Time, Tea Breaks, and the Frontier of Control in UK Workplaces », Historical Studies in Industrial Relations, vol. 41, n° 1, 2020.

ŽIŽEK Slavoj, « Shoplifters of the World Unite », London Review of Books, 19 août 2011, [URL: https://www.lrb.co.uk/2011/08/19/slavoj-zizek/shoplifters-of-the-world-unite].

Symposium “Revisiting cultural theory and practice for creating a more inclusive society”

Friday 23 and Saturday 24 June 2023

Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3

SIETAR FRANCE symposium, organized by Dr. Grazia Ghellini, President of SIETAR FRANCE, in partnership with Professor Anne Cremieux, Director of the Intercultural Negotiation Master Program (NPI) at the University Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3 in collaboration with Dr. George Simons and Pr. Alex Frame from the University of Burgundy, France.

This symposium will acquaint you with the latest developments in intercultural & neuroscientific theory and give you hands-on activities and games to experience and use in your professional interventions.

Registration Fee: Free for University of Montpellier students and staff, but registration is compulsory.

  • 25 euros per day for SIETAR France members and SIETAR Europe and other national SIETAR members.
  • 10 Euros per day for online participants, unemployed people, participants in financial difficulties and students from other educational establishments.
  • 40 euros per day for other participants.

Please contact Grazia Ghellini for further information.

Language : Bilingual Symposium

Language of Presentations: English with French subtitles, Q&A, group exercises and discussions in both English and French.

 Process

The Symposium will take place in a hybrid mode. Some of the speakers will be presenting online. It will be possible to participate online, but face-to-face participation is encouraged as the quality of the audio is not guaranteed due to the lack of proper equipment; some of the activities or debates might not be fully accessible.

Target Audience: Intercultural professionals and aspirants, both academic and organizational, and students wishing to specialize in the intercultural field.

 Take away learnings:

  • Up to date cultural theory
  • Resources and activities for applying these perspectives in:
    • Self understanding
    • Teaching and training
    • Updating research efforts

Take away resources:

  • Populism and Decolonization diversophy® game
  • Facilitation guide
  • IncluKIT activities

Full programme in French

JE “Queering Blackness : cultures populaires et représentations noires non-binaires à l’ère post-Obama”

Vendredi 16 juin 2023

Université Paul Valéry Montpellier 3, Site St Charles, salle 126

Journée d’études co-organisée par Yannick Blec (TransCrit, Paris 8) et Anne Crémieux (UPVM3, EMMA).

Les représentations des sujets africains américains sont marquées par des stéréotypes historiques documentés de longue date par des historiens des représentations, notamment les historiens américains du cinéma Thomas Cripps et Donald Bogle, le sociologue britannique Stuart Hall, ou encore l’historien britannique du cinéma Richard Dyer. Ces premières études ont été enrichies de nombreux écrits critiques remettant en cause la binarité des représentations sexuelles et de genre, particulièrement ceux de bell hooks, Audre Lorde, Michelle Parkerson, E. Patrick Johnson, James Small, C. Riley Snorton, Mia Mask ou Alfred L. Martin. Ces analyses s’intéressent, le plus souvent, à critiquer les productions commerciales les plus appréciées du public, aussi bien pour en dénoncer les limites que pour en repérer les avancées reflétant les théories les plus récentes.

L’élection de Barack Obama à la présidence américaine a ouvert une ère dite « post-raciale », un terme repris dans le titre du dernier ouvrage de bell hooks par exemple (Writing Beyond Race: Living Theory and Practice, 2013), où la binarité raciale ancrée dans l’histoire états-unienne est fortement remise en cause dans une réflexion intersectionnelle qui questionne toutes les formes de binarité. On le voit au cinéma avec l’influence majeure d’un personnage comme Black Panther, égérie de l’afro-futurisme portée par une armée d’Amazones dans le rejet de la masculinité toxique attribué au mouvement éponyme des années soixante-dix ; on l’entend dans l’industrie musicale avec la notoriété grandissante de l’artiste ouvertement homosexuel et distinctement excentrique Lil Nas X. Ce phénomène se déploie dans tous les médias populaires, qu’il s’agisse de la télévision et de ses séries à succès, de la bande dessinée ou des jeux vidéo.

C’est de ce constat de représentations d’identités noires, qui remettent en cause toute forme de binarité et opèrent des déploiements intersectionnels au sein des cultures populaires africaines américaines, qu’émane l’interrogation principale à l’origine de ce projet. À partir de communications autour de ces représentations dans les arts populaires, accessibles par une large majorité comme au sein de la communauté noire américaine, cette journée d’études a pour objectif d’en examiner l’évolution depuis dix ans et les efforts manifestes engagés pour s’éloigner des représentations normatives binaires encore aujourd’hui prêtées aux minorités raciales états-uniennes davantage qu’à ladite majorité dominante blanche.

Il s’agit de la Journée d’étude n°2. La Journée d’étude n°1 a été organisée le 17 novembre 2022 à l’Université Paris 8 dans le cadre des travaux de l’axe de recherche « Imaginer les communautés » de l’Unité de recherche TransCrit (en partenariat avec l’Unité EMMA). La nature du sujet traité invitait des communications interdisciplinaires relevant des études d’arts, de la civilisation, de la sociologie, des études de genre, et bien d’autres.

Vous trouverez ci-dessous le programme de la JE du 16 juin :